..
  • Sprachen

  • Recent Posts

  • Intern

  • Archiv

  • Meta

  • / cscw / home /
     

    Living Lab Energy & Environment

    LivingLab
    Duration: 2014-2017

    Sponsorship: Ministerium für Klimaschutz, Umwelt, Landwirtschaft, Natur- und Verbraucherschutz des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen (MKULNV)

    Contact person: M. Sc. Nico Castelli

    In the research project Living Lab Energy & Environment (www.livinglab-energy.de), an innovative, flexible energy management system is been developed in close cooperation with private households and business application partners. The system is capable of recording energy consumption continuously, combining it with data from other systems and visualising it according to individual requirements. Consumers are provided with access to a live overview of current energy consumption, comparisons with historical values and optimisation tips. In contrast to other solutions which are already available, the system is easy to use and individually customizable in order to meet local requirements.
    More information on www.livinglab-energy.de

    Publications

    2020


    • Ahmadi, M., Eilert, R., Weibert, A., Wulf, V. & Marsden, N. (2020)Feminist Living Labs as Research Infrastructures for HCI: The Case of a Video Game Company

      Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–15 doi:10.1145/3313831.3376716
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      The number of women in IT is still low and companies struggle to integrate female professionals. The aim of our research is to provide methodological support for understanding and sharing experiences of gendered practices in the IT industry and encouraging sustained reflection about these matters over time. We established a Living Lab with that end in view, aiming to enhance female participation in the IT workforce and committing ourselves to a participatory approach to the sharing of women’s experiences. Here, using the case of a German video game company which participated in our Lab, we detail our lessons learned. We show that this kind of long-term participation involves challenges over the lifetime of the project but can lead to substantial benefits for organizations. Our findings demonstrate that Living Labs are suitable for giving voice to marginalized groups, addressing their concerns and evoking change possibilities. Nevertheless, uncertainties about long-term sustainability remain.

      @inproceedings{ahmadi_feminist_2020,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{CHI} '20},
      title = {Feminist {Living} {Labs} as {Research} {Infrastructures} for {HCI}: {The} {Case} of a {Video} {Game} {Company}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-6708-0},
      shorttitle = {Feminist {Living} {Labs} as {Research} {Infrastructures} for {HCI}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376716},
      doi = {10.1145/3313831.3376716},
      abstract = {The number of women in IT is still low and companies struggle to integrate female professionals. The aim of our research is to provide methodological support for understanding and sharing experiences of gendered practices in the IT industry and encouraging sustained reflection about these matters over time. We established a Living Lab with that end in view, aiming to enhance female participation in the IT workforce and committing ourselves to a participatory approach to the sharing of women's experiences. Here, using the case of a German video game company which participated in our Lab, we detail our lessons learned. We show that this kind of long-term participation involves challenges over the lifetime of the project but can lead to substantial benefits for organizations. Our findings demonstrate that Living Labs are suitable for giving voice to marginalized groups, addressing their concerns and evoking change possibilities. Nevertheless, uncertainties about long-term sustainability remain.},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2020 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Eilert, Rebecca and Weibert, Anne and Wulf, Volker and Marsden, Nicola},
      month = apr,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {methodology, living lab, ethnography, gender, feminist HCI, feminist research, participatory action research, a-paper},
      pages = {1--15},
      }


    • Ahmadi, M., Eilert, R., Weibert, A., Wulf, V. & Marsden, N. (2020)“We want to push the industry via communication”… Designing Communication Measures to Foster Gender Diversity in a Video Game Company

      IN Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 4, Pages: 16:1–16:26 doi:10.1145/3375196
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Participation of women in IT is still low and companies wonder which external communication measures are necessary to attract more female personnel. To gain a richer understanding of adequate gender sensitive ways of communicating towards girls and women, one needs to take into account contextual challenges. Following a Participatory Action Research approach, we conducted a qualitative field study in a video game company in a large city in Germany, identified areas of concern, and sketched out implications for gender-sensitive communication measures together with our participants. Findings show that addressing gender stereotypes, making role models visible, and using adequate channels is relevant. Some problems might be solved via short-term solutions, but the majority require a long-term perspective. Our lessons learned leave implications for companies in the IT sector who want to foster gender sensitive external communication measures and can contribute to the realization of more gender balanced working environments.

      @article{ahmadi_we_2020,
      title = {"{We} want to push the industry via communication"... {Designing} {Communication} {Measures} to {Foster} {Gender} {Diversity} in a {Video} {Game} {Company}},
      volume = {4},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3375196},
      doi = {10.1145/3375196},
      abstract = {Participation of women in IT is still low and companies wonder which external communication measures are necessary to attract more female personnel. To gain a richer understanding of adequate gender sensitive ways of communicating towards girls and women, one needs to take into account contextual challenges. Following a Participatory Action Research approach, we conducted a qualitative field study in a video game company in a large city in Germany, identified areas of concern, and sketched out implications for gender-sensitive communication measures together with our participants. Findings show that addressing gender stereotypes, making role models visible, and using adequate channels is relevant. Some problems might be solved via short-term solutions, but the majority require a long-term perspective. Our lessons learned leave implications for companies in the IT sector who want to foster gender sensitive external communication measures and can contribute to the realization of more gender balanced working environments.},
      number = {GROUP},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Eilert, Rebecca and Weibert, Anne and Wulf, Volker and Marsden, Nicola},
      month = jan,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {qualitative research, living lab, employer branding, external communication, gender, video game industry, talent acquisition},
      pages = {16:1--16:26},
      }

    2019


    • Ahmadi, M., Herling, C., Wulf, V. & Marsden, N. (2019)Living Labs als feministische Forschungsinfrastrukturen: Fallstudie eines Reallabors

      doi:10.18420/MUC2019-WS-626
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In diesem Positionspapier diskutieren wir den partizipativen Ansatz der Living Labs anhand eines Fallbeispiels als eine Möglichkeit, feministische Werte in der Forschung zu adressieren.

      @article{ahmadi_living_2019,
      title = {Living {Labs} als feministische {Forschungsinfrastrukturen}: {Fallstudie} eines {Reallabors}},
      shorttitle = {Living {Labs} als feministische {Forschungsinfrastrukturen}},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/25242},
      doi = {10.18420/MUC2019-WS-626},
      abstract = {In diesem Positionspapier diskutieren wir den partizipativen Ansatz der Living Labs anhand eines Fallbeispiels als eine Möglichkeit, feministische Werte in der Forschung zu adressieren.},
      language = {de},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Herling, Claudia and Wulf, Volker and Marsden, Nicola},
      year = {2019},
      note = {Publisher: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
      keywords = {Living Lab, Gender and IT, Participatory Action Research, Qualitative Research, Women in Computing},
      }

    2018


    • Ahmadi, M., Weibert, A., Ogonowski, C., Aal, K., Gäckle, K., Marsden, N. & Wulf, V. (2018)Challenges and lessons learned by applying living labs in gender and IT contexts

      Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Gender & IT. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 239–249 doi:10.1145/3196839.3196878
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Women interested in computing are still facing several problems considering equality and career chances. Companies realize the opportunities of diversity and yet for several reasons they are struggling to hire or integrate young female professionals. Although gender study research provides promising frameworks there are still issues in applying them in working environments and practices. For this purpose, we made use of the Living Lab approach in the context of gender and IT. The Living Lab’s methodology offers opportunities to reveal new, relevant insights and create social change in a collaborative way. We stretched the existing understanding of this concept and follow a Participatory Action Research approach. In this paper we describe the setup of the Living Lab and present first insights from our research. We found that showing patience, organizing adequate spaces for reflection as well as facilitating motivation and trust is vital in such a sensitive research context.

      @inproceedings{ahmadi_challenges_2018-1,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{GenderIT} '18},
      title = {Challenges and lessons learned by applying living labs in gender and {IT} contexts},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-5346-5},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3196839.3196878},
      doi = {10.1145/3196839.3196878},
      abstract = {Women interested in computing are still facing several problems considering equality and career chances. Companies realize the opportunities of diversity and yet for several reasons they are struggling to hire or integrate young female professionals. Although gender study research provides promising frameworks there are still issues in applying them in working environments and practices. For this purpose, we made use of the Living Lab approach in the context of gender and IT. The Living Lab's methodology offers opportunities to reveal new, relevant insights and create social change in a collaborative way. We stretched the existing understanding of this concept and follow a Participatory Action Research approach. In this paper we describe the setup of the Living Lab and present first insights from our research. We found that showing patience, organizing adequate spaces for reflection as well as facilitating motivation and trust is vital in such a sensitive research context.},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 4th {Conference} on {Gender} \& {IT}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Weibert, Anne and Ogonowski, Corinna and Aal, Konstantin and Gäckle, Kristian and Marsden, Nicola and Wulf, Volker},
      month = may,
      year = {2018},
      keywords = {methodology, qualitative research, living lab, participatory action research, gender and IT, women in computing},
      pages = {239--249},
      }

    2016


    • Ogonowski, C., Aal, K., Vaziri, D., Rekowski, T. V., Randall, D., Schreiber, D., Wieching, R. & Wulf, V. (2016)ICT-Based Fall Prevention System for Older Adults: Qualitative Results from a Long-Term Field Study

      IN ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact., Vol. 23, Pages: 29:1–29:33 doi:10.1145/2967102
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{ogonowski_ict-based_2016,
      title = {{ICT}-{Based} {Fall} {Prevention} {System} for {Older} {Adults}: {Qualitative} {Results} from a {Long}-{Term} {Field} {Study}},
      volume = {23},
      issn = {1073-0516},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2967102},
      doi = {10.1145/2967102},
      number = {5},
      journal = {ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact.},
      author = {Ogonowski, Corinna and Aal, Konstantin and Vaziri, Daryoush and Rekowski, Thomas Von and Randall, Dave and Schreiber, Dirk and Wieching, Rainer and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2016},
      keywords = {qualitative research, Living Lab, Exergame, fall prevention, fall risk, long-term study, older adults},
      pages = {29:1--29:33},
      annote = {Place: New York, NY, USA Publisher: ACM},
      }

    2015


    • Müller, C., Hornung, D., Hamm, T. & Wulf, V. (2015)Practice – based Design of a Neighborhood Portal : Focusing on Elderly Tenants in a City Quarter Living Lab

      IN Proceedings of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Pages: 2295–2304 doi:10.1145/2702123.2702449
      [BibTeX] [Abstract]

      This paper contributes to the current discourse on practicebased research in HCI paying particular attention to the overall temporal and situational conditions which frame an R&D project. We present a Living Lab study situated in an arbitrary neighborhood of a German city which develops ICT support to foster informal help and social interaction with a special, but not exclusive, focus on elderly tenants. We demonstrate that practice-based, long-term research in a city quarter goes beyond those challenges already described in the current Living Lab and PD literature. The long-term study’s positioning in a real-world context is contoured not only by a high diversity of stakeholders and their individual interests and motivation for participation but also by their individual skill sets and learning needs. These distinct and often contradictive perspectives have to be permanently counterbalanced. Thus attention has to be focused on how related strategies and decisions impact on the design of the project as well as on the final ICT product. To enable all tenants, irrespective of age and technical skill, to participate in a long-term ICT-based community development project, we applied the format of ‘experience-based PD workshops’ to foster confidence in ICT usage and encourage the competency of the elderly and non-tech-savvy tenants.

      @article{muller_practice_2015,
      title = {Practice - based {Design} of a {Neighborhood} {Portal} : {Focusing} on {Elderly} {Tenants} in a {City} {Quarter} {Living} {Lab}},
      doi = {10.1145/2702123.2702449},
      abstract = {This paper contributes to the current discourse on practicebased research in HCI paying particular attention to the overall temporal and situational conditions which frame an R\&D project. We present a Living Lab study situated in an arbitrary neighborhood of a German city which develops ICT support to foster informal help and social interaction with a special, but not exclusive, focus on elderly tenants. We demonstrate that practice-based, long-term research in a city quarter goes beyond those challenges already described in the current Living Lab and PD literature. The long-term study's positioning in a real-world context is contoured not only by a high diversity of stakeholders and their individual interests and motivation for participation but also by their individual skill sets and learning needs. These distinct and often contradictive perspectives have to be permanently counterbalanced. Thus attention has to be focused on how related strategies and decisions impact on the design of the project as well as on the final ICT product. To enable all tenants, irrespective of age and technical skill, to participate in a long-term ICT-based community development project, we applied the format of ‘experience-based PD workshops' to foster confidence in ICT usage and encourage the competency of the elderly and non-tech-savvy tenants.},
      journal = {Proceedings of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI)},
      author = {Müller, Claudia and Hornung, Dominik and Hamm, Theodor and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2015},
      keywords = {methodology, action research, city quarter, design, elderly people, Living Lab, participatory, practice, italg, a-paper},
      pages = {2295--2304},
      annote = {ISBN: 9781450331456},
      }

    2013


    • Ogonowski, C., Ley, B., Hess, J., Wan, L. & Wulf, V. (2013)Designing for the Living Room: Long-term User Involvement in a Living Lab

      Proceedings of CHI ’13. New York, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 1539–1548 doi:10.1145/2470654.2466205
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{ogonowski_designing_2013,
      address = {New York, USA},
      series = {{CHI} '13},
      title = {Designing for the {Living} {Room}: {Long}-term {User} {Involvement} in a {Living} {Lab}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-1899-0},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2470654.2466205},
      doi = {10.1145/2470654.2466205},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {CHI} '13},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Ogonowski, Corinna and Ley, Benedikt and Hess, Jan and Wan, Lin and Wulf, Volker},
      month = apr,
      year = {2013},
      keywords = {CSCW, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, SMARTLIVE, SocialMedia, participatory design, living lab, LivingLabEnergy, domestic domain, long-term user study},
      pages = {1539--1548},
      }


    • Ogonowski, C., Ley, B. & Stevens, G. (2013)Challenges of Long-Term User Involvement in a Living Lab

      CHI ’13 Workshop on Methods for Studying Technology in the Home., Pages: 1–4
      [BibTeX]

      @inproceedings{ogonowski_challenges_2013,
      title = {Challenges of {Long}-{Term} {User} {Involvement} in a {Living} {Lab}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-1899-0},
      booktitle = {{CHI} '13 {Workshop} on {Methods} for {Studying} {Technology} in the {Home}},
      author = {Ogonowski, Corinna and Ley, Benedikt and Stevens, Gunnar},
      year = {2013},
      keywords = {PRAXLABS, Living Lab, long-term study, LivingLabEnergy, domestic domain, a-paper},
      pages = {1--4},
      }


    • Ley, B., Ogonowski, C., Hess, J., Reichling, T., Wan, L. & Wulf, V. (2013)Impacts of New Technologies on Media Usage and Social Behaviour in Domestic Environments

      IN Behaviour & Information Technology, Vol. 33, Pages: 37–41 doi:10.1080/0144929X.2013.832383
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{ley_impacts_2013,
      title = {Impacts of {New} {Technologies} on {Media} {Usage} and {Social} {Behaviour} in {Domestic} {Environments}},
      volume = {33},
      url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144929X.2013.832383},
      doi = {10.1080/0144929X.2013.832383},
      number = {August},
      journal = {Behaviour \& Information Technology},
      author = {Ley, Benedikt and Ogonowski, Corinna and Hess, Jan and Reichling, Tim and Wan, Lin and Wulf, Volker},
      month = aug,
      year = {2013},
      keywords = {CSCW, PRAXLABS, SocialMedia, Living Lab, diary study, living room, media usage, television, long-term study},
      pages = {37--41},
      annote = {Place: Bristol, PA, USA Publisher: Taylor \& Francis, Inc.},
      }

    2012


    • Hess, J., Ley, B., Ogonowski, C., Reichling, T., Wan, L. & Wulf, V. (2012)New Technology@Home: Impacts on Usage Behavior and Social Structures

      Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Interactive TV and Video. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 185–194 doi:10.1145/2325616.2325653
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{hess_new_2012,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{EuroiTV} '12},
      title = {New {Technology}@{Home}: {Impacts} on {Usage} {Behavior} and {Social} {Structures}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-1107-6},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2325616.2325653},
      doi = {10.1145/2325616.2325653},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 10th {European} {Conference} on {Interactive} {TV} and {Video}},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Hess, Jan and Ley, Benedikt and Ogonowski, Corinna and Reichling, Tim and Wan, Lin and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2012},
      keywords = {CSCW, SocialMedia, EUDISMES, diary study, living lab, living room, media usage, television},
      pages = {185--194},
      }


    • Hess, J., Ley, B., Ogonowski, C., Reichling, T., Wan, L. & Wulf, V. (2012)New Technology @ Home : Impacts on Usage Behavior and Social Structures

      Proceedings of EuroITV ’12. New York, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 185–194
      [BibTeX] [Abstract]

      Studying domestic usage contexts has become an important field in research. Recent technological improvements have made media available on different devices, in different contexts and from different places. The adoption and appropriation of new devices and technologies has led to a more flexible usage behavior. However, even if we know about such a behavior, many questions, regarding how new technology changes the user’s media usage and how these changes affect the social structure in a household, are still unanswered. We will address this topic in our work and want to provide an insight on how recent media consumption patterns have changed due to the appropriation of new technologies in the home. Based on a qualitative long-term Living Lab study we will present various patterns based on changes in media usage routines and their influences on households as social systems. The results provide a detailed understanding of how the new technology is embedded within domestic life by considering potentials and conflicts that also address further design oriented work.

      @inproceedings{hess_new_2012-1,
      address = {New York, USA},
      title = {New {Technology} @ {Home} : {Impacts} on {Usage} {Behavior} and {Social} {Structures}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-1107-6},
      abstract = {Studying domestic usage contexts has become an important field in research. Recent technological improvements have made media available on different devices, in different contexts and from different places. The adoption and appropriation of new devices and technologies has led to a more flexible usage behavior. However, even if we know about such a behavior, many questions, regarding how new technology changes the user's media usage and how these changes affect the social structure in a household, are still unanswered. We will address this topic in our work and want to provide an insight on how recent media consumption patterns have changed due to the appropriation of new technologies in the home. Based on a qualitative long-term Living Lab study we will present various patterns based on changes in media usage routines and their influences on households as social systems. The results provide a detailed understanding of how the new technology is embedded within domestic life by considering potentials and conflicts that also address further design oriented work.},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {EuroITV} '12},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Hess, Jan and Ley, Benedikt and Ogonowski, Corinna and Reichling, Tim and Wan, Lin and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2012},
      keywords = {PRAXLABS, diary study, living lab, living room, media usage, television, LivingLabEnergy},
      pages = {185--194},
      }

    2011


    • Hess, J., Ley, B., Ogonowski, C., Wan, L. & Wulf, V. (2011)Jumping Between Devices and Services: Towards an Integrated Concept for Social TV

      Proceddings of the 9th International Interactive Conference on Interactive Television. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 11–20 doi:10.1145/2000119.2000122
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{hess_jumping_2011,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{EuroITV} '11},
      title = {Jumping {Between} {Devices} and {Services}: {Towards} an {Integrated} {Concept} for {Social} {TV}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-0602-7},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2000119.2000122},
      doi = {10.1145/2000119.2000122},
      booktitle = {Proceddings of the 9th {International} {Interactive} {Conference} on {Interactive} {Television}},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Hess, Jan and Ley, Benedikt and Ogonowski, Corinna and Wan, Lin and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2011},
      keywords = {CSCW, social media, SocialMedia, participatory design, diary study, living lab, social tv},
      pages = {11--20},
      }

    2010


    • Hess, J. & Ogonowski, C. (2010)Steps toward a living lab for socialmedia concept evaluation and continuous user-involvement

      Proceedings of EuroITV ’10. New York, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 171–174 doi:10.1145/1809777.1809812
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Involving users in the design and evaluation process of new technical artefacts is a fundamental approach in building usable and acceptable applications and services. To conduct such studies in realistic settings, the Living Lab methodology has been established over last few years. In our research work we estab- lished such a lab in a local area with the intention of building a foundation on which to evaluate ideas and prototypes around the Social Media topic. In this paper we describe our approach and point out issues that occurred within the build-up process. Crucial aspects include the selection process, the organisation and especially the question of how clusters of households can be built.

      @inproceedings{hess_steps_2010,
      address = {New York, USA},
      title = {Steps toward a living lab for socialmedia concept evaluation and continuous user-involvement},
      isbn = {978-1-60558-831-5},
      url = {http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1809777.1809812},
      doi = {10.1145/1809777.1809812},
      abstract = {Involving users in the design and evaluation process of new technical artefacts is a fundamental approach in building usable and acceptable applications and services. To conduct such studies in realistic settings, the Living Lab methodology has been established over last few years. In our research work we estab- lished such a lab in a local area with the intention of building a foundation on which to evaluate ideas and prototypes around the Social Media topic. In this paper we describe our approach and point out issues that occurred within the build-up process. Crucial aspects include the selection process, the organisation and especially the question of how clusters of households can be built.},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {EuroITV} '10},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Hess, Jan and Ogonowski, Corinna},
      year = {2010},
      keywords = {social media, participatory design, Smart Live, living lab},
      pages = {171--174},
      }