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    Dr. Peter Tolmie

    Principal Research Scientist

    Mail: peter.tolmie@uni-siegen.de 

    Vita

    Peter Tolmie originally trained as a musician and is an Associate in Music at Trinity College London. He later shifted his attention to the social sciences and gained a First Class Honours degree in Independent Studies at Lancaster University in 1997. This was followed by a PhD in Sociology, also at Lancaster, which he completed in 2003. After finishing his graduate studies in 1997 he worked as an ethnographer and ethnomethodologist with a number of well-known figures in CSCW at Lancaster’s Centre for CSCW. In 2000 he was recruited to work as a Research Scientist at Xerox Research Centre Europe’s Cambridge laboratory. When the Cambridge lab closed in 2002 he moved to working at XRCE’s sister laboratory in Grenoble, where he stayed until 2006, becoming Area Manager of the Work Practice Technology Group in 2005. In 2006 he began working as a freelance consultant, chiefly for the University of Nottingham’s Mixed Reality Laboratory. He became a full-time member of staff at Nottingham in 2010, where he stayed until moving to Siegen in April 2017.

    He has conducted ethnographic studies across numerous settings including: retail banking; small businesses; home environments; gaming and mobile-based artistic experiences; musical performance and music production; administrative work; outdoor leisure pastimes; museums and galleries; the TV and film industries; bid management; healthcare professionals treating breast cancer; and journalism.

    He has been published widely in both journals and conferences in the domains of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Ubiquitous Computing and Human-Computer Interaction. Amongst the most cited of his works are: ‘Unremarkable Computing’ (CHI, 2002, with James Pycock, Tim Diggins, et al); ‘Making the Home Network at Home: Digital Housekeeping’’ (ECSCW, 2007, with Andy Crabtree, Tom Rodden, Chris Greenhalgh and Steven Benford); and ‘The Adequate Design of Ethnographic Outputs for Practice’ (PUC, 2003, with Tim Diggins). A publication relating to his recent work with journalists gained a best paper award at CHI in 2017 (with Rob Proctor, Dave Randall, Mark Rouncefield, et al). He is also the author of a book on intimacy in domestic environments (‘Everyday Intimacy’, 2010), the joint author of two books on the relationship between ethnographic work and design (‘Doing Design Ethnography’, 2012, with Andy Crabtree and Mark Rouncefield; and ‘Deconstructing Ethnography’, 2015, with Graham Button, Andy Crabtree, and Mark Rouncefield), and the joint editor of two published volumes of articles relating to ethnomethodological studies of work and of play (‘Ethnomethodology at Work’, 2011, and ‘Ethnomethodology at Play’, 2013, both with Mark Rouncefield). He is also an active reviewer for a number of the major computing conferences and journals and regularly serves as an associate and sub-committee chair.

    selected publications

    Publications

    2021


    • Rüller, S., Aal, K., Holdermann, S., Tolmie, P., Hartmann, A., Rohde, M., Zillinger, M. & Wulf, V. (2021)‘Technology is Everywhere, we have the Opportunity to Learn it in the Valley’: The Appropriation of a Socio-Technical Enabling Infrastructure in the Moroccan High Atlas

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) doi:10.1007/s10606-021-09401-8
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      This paper describes the appropriation processes involved in establishing a socio-technical enabling infrastructure in a valley in the High Atlas of Morocco. We focus on the challenges of co-establishing such an intervention in a rural/mountainous region that is already undergoing a process of continuous development and profound transformation. We reflect upon the changes and unforeseen appropriation by our local partners and inhabitants in the valley of a computer club primarily used as an informal learning centre for school children. We followed an ethnographic approach and combined research perspectives from both socio-informatics and anthropology. This paper sheds light on what a successful cooperation and intervention in this kind of challenging environment can look like. It does this by taking seriously competing expectations, fragile infrastructural foundations and the socio-cultural context. Despite the challenges, the intervention managed to lead to the establishment of a socio-technical enabling infrastructure that plays a particularly valuable role in local educational endeavours and that is now moving towards supporting other members of the community. The paper thus provides insights regarding what has to be considered to create a mutually beneficial cooperation with all relevant stakeholders as well as a sustainable intervention.

      @article{ruller_technology_2021,
      title = {‘{Technology} is {Everywhere}, we have the {Opportunity} to {Learn} it in the {Valley}’: {The} {Appropriation} of a {Socio}-{Technical} {Enabling} {Infrastructure} in the {Moroccan} {High} {Atlas}},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      shorttitle = {‘{Technology} is {Everywhere}, we have the {Opportunity} to {Learn} it in the {Valley}’},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-021-09401-8},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-021-09401-8},
      abstract = {This paper describes the appropriation processes involved in establishing a socio-technical enabling infrastructure in a valley in the High Atlas of Morocco. We focus on the challenges of co-establishing such an intervention in a rural/mountainous region that is already undergoing a process of continuous development and profound transformation. We reflect upon the changes and unforeseen appropriation by our local partners and inhabitants in the valley of a computer club primarily used as an informal learning centre for school children. We followed an ethnographic approach and combined research perspectives from both socio-informatics and anthropology. This paper sheds light on what a successful cooperation and intervention in this kind of challenging environment can look like. It does this by taking seriously competing expectations, fragile infrastructural foundations and the socio-cultural context. Despite the challenges, the intervention managed to lead to the establishment of a socio-technical enabling infrastructure that plays a particularly valuable role in local educational endeavours and that is now moving towards supporting other members of the community. The paper thus provides insights regarding what has to be considered to create a mutually beneficial cooperation with all relevant stakeholders as well as a sustainable intervention.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-11-15},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Rüller, Sarah and Aal, Konstantin and Holdermann, Simon and Tolmie, Peter and Hartmann, Andrea and Rohde, Markus and Zillinger, Martin and Wulf, Volker},
      month = nov,
      year = {2021},
      file = {Springer Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\V3YYKV7M\\Rüller et al. - 2021 - ‘Technology is Everywhere, we have the Opportunity.pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Jasche, F., Kirchhübel, J., Ludwig, T. & Tolmie, P. (2021)BeamLite: Diminishing Ecological Fractures of Remote Collaboration through Mixed Reality Environments

      C&T ’21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies – Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 200–211 doi:10.1145/3461564.3461566
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Developing systems to support remote collaboration usually involves creating new environments in which non-co-located participants produce actions that are, at least in part, accessible to one another. However, this typically fractures the relationship between those actions and the sense of a shared environment, engendering difficulties that can render even the simplest of activities problematic. This becomes more pronounced as the activities become more complex and involve physical artifacts. Although mixed reality seems to offer promising ways of overcoming these troubles, there is still a risk of replicating the fractured ecology problem. We report on an empirical study and the development of a mixed reality prototype called BeamLite that seeks to bypass such issues by providing participants with the illusion of them sharing a single familiar place. Although our evaluation revealed possibilities for evading some troubles associated with artifact-focused remote collaboration, it exposed the need for virtual toolboxes that dynamically support specific work practices and the importance of virtual artifacts embedded within the physical environment to further diminish the sense of ecological fracture.

      @inproceedings{jasche_beamlite_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {C\&{T} '21},
      title = {{BeamLite}: {Diminishing} {Ecological} {Fractures} of {Remote} {Collaboration} through {Mixed} {Reality} {Environments}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9056-9},
      shorttitle = {{BeamLite}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3461564.3461566},
      doi = {10.1145/3461564.3461566},
      abstract = {Developing systems to support remote collaboration usually involves creating new environments in which non-co-located participants produce actions that are, at least in part, accessible to one another. However, this typically fractures the relationship between those actions and the sense of a shared environment, engendering difficulties that can render even the simplest of activities problematic. This becomes more pronounced as the activities become more complex and involve physical artifacts. Although mixed reality seems to offer promising ways of overcoming these troubles, there is still a risk of replicating the fractured ecology problem. We report on an empirical study and the development of a mixed reality prototype called BeamLite that seeks to bypass such issues by providing participants with the illusion of them sharing a single familiar place. Although our evaluation revealed possibilities for evading some troubles associated with artifact-focused remote collaboration, it exposed the need for virtual toolboxes that dynamically support specific work practices and the importance of virtual artifacts embedded within the physical environment to further diminish the sense of ecological fracture.},
      urldate = {2021-09-23},
      booktitle = {C\&{T} '21: {Proceedings} of the 10th {International} {Conference} on {Communities} \& {Technologies} - {Wicked} {Problems} in the {Age} of {Tech}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Kirchhübel, Jasmin and Ludwig, Thomas and Tolmie, Peter},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Remote Collaboration, Unfractured Ecologies, Virtual Reality},
      pages = {200--211},
      file = {Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\A8FW8JA8\\Jasche et al. - 2021 - BeamLite Diminishing Ecological Fractures of Remo.pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Ludwig, T., Stickel, O., Tolmie, P. & Sellmer, M. (2021)shARe-IT: Ad hoc Remote Troubleshooting through Augmented Reality

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) doi:10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      10 years ago, Castellani et al. (Journal of Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 18, no. 2–3, 2009, pp. 199–227, 2009) showed that using just an audio channel for remote troubleshooting can lead to a range of problems and already envisioned a future in which augmented reality (AR) could solve many of these issues. In the meantime, AR technologies have found their way into our everyday lives and using such technologies to support remote collaboration has been widely studied within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. In this paper, we contribute to this body of research by reporting on an extensive empirical study within a Fab Lab of troubleshooting and expertise sharing and the potential relevance of articulation work to their realization. Based on the findings of this study, we derived design challenges that led to an AR-based concept, implemented as a HoloLens application, called shARe-it. This application is designed to support remote troubleshooting and expertise sharing through different communication channels and AR-based interaction modalities. Early testing of the application revealed that novel interaction modalities such as AR-based markers and drawings play only a minor role in remote collaboration due to various limiting factors. Instead, the transmission of a shared view and especially arriving at a shared understanding of the situation as a prerequisite for articulation work continue to be the decisive factors in remote troubleshooting.

      @article{ludwig_share-it_2021,
      title = {{shARe}-{IT}: {Ad} hoc {Remote} {Troubleshooting} through {Augmented} {Reality}},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      shorttitle = {{shARe}-{IT}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5},
      abstract = {10 years ago, Castellani et al. (Journal of Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 18, no. 2–3, 2009, pp. 199–227, 2009) showed that using just an audio channel for remote troubleshooting can lead to a range of problems and already envisioned a future in which augmented reality (AR) could solve many of these issues. In the meantime, AR technologies have found their way into our everyday lives and using such technologies to support remote collaboration has been widely studied within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. In this paper, we contribute to this body of research by reporting on an extensive empirical study within a Fab Lab of troubleshooting and expertise sharing and the potential relevance of articulation work to their realization. Based on the findings of this study, we derived design challenges that led to an AR-based concept, implemented as a HoloLens application, called shARe-it. This application is designed to support remote troubleshooting and expertise sharing through different communication channels and AR-based interaction modalities. Early testing of the application revealed that novel interaction modalities such as AR-based markers and drawings play only a minor role in remote collaboration due to various limiting factors. Instead, the transmission of a shared view and especially arriving at a shared understanding of the situation as a prerequisite for articulation work continue to be the decisive factors in remote troubleshooting.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Stickel, Oliver and Tolmie, Peter and Sellmer, Malte},
      month = feb,
      year = {2021},
      }


    • Ludwig, T., Stickel, O., Tolmie, P. & Sellmer, M. (2021)shARe-IT: Ad hoc Remote Troubleshooting through Augmented Reality

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) doi:10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      10 years ago, Castellani et al. (Journal of Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 18, no. 2–3, 2009, pp. 199–227, 2009) showed that using just an audio channel for remote troubleshooting can lead to a range of problems and already envisioned a future in which augmented reality (AR) could solve many of these issues. In the meantime, AR technologies have found their way into our everyday lives and using such technologies to support remote collaboration has been widely studied within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. In this paper, we contribute to this body of research by reporting on an extensive empirical study within a Fab Lab of troubleshooting and expertise sharing and the potential relevance of articulation work to their realization. Based on the findings of this study, we derived design challenges that led to an AR-based concept, implemented as a HoloLens application, called shARe-it. This application is designed to support remote troubleshooting and expertise sharing through different communication channels and AR-based interaction modalities. Early testing of the application revealed that novel interaction modalities such as AR-based markers and drawings play only a minor role in remote collaboration due to various limiting factors. Instead, the transmission of a shared view and especially arriving at a shared understanding of the situation as a prerequisite for articulation work continue to be the decisive factors in remote troubleshooting.

      @article{ludwig_share-it_2021-1,
      title = {{shARe}-{IT}: {Ad} hoc {Remote} {Troubleshooting} through {Augmented} {Reality}},
      issn = {0925-9724},
      url = {http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-021-09393-5},
      abstract = {10 years ago, Castellani et al. (Journal of Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 18, no. 2–3, 2009, pp. 199–227, 2009) showed that using just an audio channel for remote troubleshooting can lead to a range of problems and already envisioned a future in which augmented reality (AR) could solve many of these issues. In the meantime, AR technologies have found their way into our everyday lives and using such technologies to support remote collaboration has been widely studied within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. In this paper, we contribute to this body of research by reporting on an extensive empirical study within a Fab Lab of troubleshooting and expertise sharing and the potential relevance of articulation work to their realization. Based on the findings of this study, we derived design challenges that led to an AR-based concept, implemented as a HoloLens application, called shARe-it. This application is designed to support remote troubleshooting and expertise sharing through different communication channels and AR-based interaction modalities. Early testing of the application revealed that novel interaction modalities such as AR-based markers and drawings play only a minor role in remote collaboration due to various limiting factors. Instead, the transmission of a shared view and especially arriving at a shared understanding of the situation as a prerequisite for articulation work continue to be the decisive factors in remote troubleshooting.},
      number = {Cicourel 1990},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Stickel, Oliver and Tolmie, Peter and Sellmer, Malte},
      month = feb,
      year = {2021},
      note = {Publisher: Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      keywords = {CSCW, Augmented reality, Expertise sharing, Fab lab, Remote troubleshooting, fablab},
      }


    • Castelli, N., de Carvalho, A. F. P., Vitt, N., Taugerbeck, S., Randall, D., Tolmie, P., Stevens, G. & Wulf, V. (2021)On technology-assisted energy saving: challenges of digital plumbing in industrial settings

      IN Human–Computer Interaction, Pages: 1–29 doi:10.1080/07370024.2020.1855589
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{castelli_technology-assisted_2021,
      title = {On technology-assisted energy saving: challenges of digital plumbing in industrial settings},
      volume = {0},
      issn = {0737-0024},
      shorttitle = {On technology-assisted energy saving},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/07370024.2020.1855589},
      doi = {10.1080/07370024.2020.1855589},
      number = {0},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      journal = {Human–Computer Interaction},
      author = {Castelli, Nico and Carvalho, Aparecido Fabiano Pinatti de and Vitt, Nico and Taugerbeck, Sebastian and Randall, Dave and Tolmie, Peter and Stevens, Gunnar and Wulf, Volker},
      month = jan,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Digital Energy Management, Digital Plumbing, Socio Informatics},
      pages = {1--29},
      annote = {Publisher: Taylor \& Francis \_eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/07370024.2020.1855589},
      }

    2020


    • Pakusch, C., Meurer, J., Tolmie, P. & Stevens, G. (2020)Traditional taxis vs automated taxis – Does the driver matter for Millennials?

      IN Travel Behaviour and Society, Vol. 21, Pages: 214–225 doi:10.1016/j.tbs.2020.06.009
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      It is anticipated that autonomous vehicles will have a huge impact on the creation of sustainable smart cities and communities. One of the key concerns regarding autonomous vehicles is how automation may threaten jobs in the transport industry, including the traditional role of taxi drivers. To begin to explore how important an actual taxi driver is to customers and the extent to which they might be happy to have autonomous taxis replace traditional taxis, we conducted qualitative interviews with 34 Millennial-aged participants. These were problem-centered narrative interviews, largely conducted face-to-face, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Millennials were focused upon because, given current figures and likely future projections of use, they form the key market for prospective future autonomous taxis. The results show that the kind of taxi rides Millennials make are particularly suitable for automated taxis because interaction with a human driver is not a high priority for this group, while the prospect of autonomous taxis being cheaper is. Meanwhile the fate of taxi drivers does not play a significant part in how Millennials reason about this. An incidental finding, here, is that, by offering a convenient and affordable alternative, the advent of automated taxis may also pose a threat to public transportation.

      @article{pakusch_traditional_2020,
      title = {Traditional taxis vs automated taxis – {Does} the driver matter for {Millennials}?},
      volume = {21},
      issn = {2214-367X},
      url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214367X20301897},
      doi = {10.1016/j.tbs.2020.06.009},
      abstract = {It is anticipated that autonomous vehicles will have a huge impact on the creation of sustainable smart cities and communities. One of the key concerns regarding autonomous vehicles is how automation may threaten jobs in the transport industry, including the traditional role of taxi drivers. To begin to explore how important an actual taxi driver is to customers and the extent to which they might be happy to have autonomous taxis replace traditional taxis, we conducted qualitative interviews with 34 Millennial-aged participants. These were problem-centered narrative interviews, largely conducted face-to-face, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Millennials were focused upon because, given current figures and likely future projections of use, they form the key market for prospective future autonomous taxis. The results show that the kind of taxi rides Millennials make are particularly suitable for automated taxis because interaction with a human driver is not a high priority for this group, while the prospect of autonomous taxis being cheaper is. Meanwhile the fate of taxi drivers does not play a significant part in how Millennials reason about this. An incidental finding, here, is that, by offering a convenient and affordable alternative, the advent of automated taxis may also pose a threat to public transportation.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Travel Behaviour and Society},
      author = {Pakusch, Christina and Meurer, Johanna and Tolmie, Peter and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = oct,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {Qualitative research, Automated taxis, Interview study, Millennials, Mobility behavior, Shared autonomous vehicles, Sharing economies, Social sustainability, Travel mode choice},
      pages = {214--225},
      }


    • Unbehaun, D., Taugerbeck, S., Aal, K., Vaziri, D. D., Lehmann, J., Tolmie, P., Wieching, R. & Wulf, V. (2020)Notes of memories: Fostering social interaction, activity and reminiscence through an interactive music exergame developed for people with dementia and their caregivers

      IN Human–Computer Interaction, Pages: 1–34 doi:10.1080/07370024.2020.1746910
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      This paper presents the outcomes of an exploratory study focused on the evaluation of an interactive music exergame for People with Dementia (PwD) and their caregivers. PwD tend to isolate themselves from the outside world, therefore carers need to develop strategies to maintain communication with them. Studies indicate that music–based activities provide an effective way to achieve social interaction with PwD. At the same time, physical activity plays a major role in dementia-related interventions because it can slow down progression and provide meaningful stimulation. Our developed interactive music game bounds these two concerns together; we evaluated the system afterwards regarding its individual and social impact and its integration into the daily routines of both PwD and their caregivers, focusing on its capacity to provide both enjoyment and relief from some of the effects of dementia. Qualitative data collected over 4 months confirmed the valuable impact of music-based interventions of PwD. Of particular note was how PwD used the game to improve or maintain their physical condition while recovering past memories and an interest in social interaction.

      @article{unbehaun_notes_2020,
      title = {Notes of memories: {Fostering} social interaction, activity and reminiscence through an interactive music exergame developed for people with dementia and their caregivers},
      volume = {0},
      issn = {0737-0024},
      shorttitle = {Notes of memories},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/07370024.2020.1746910},
      doi = {10.1080/07370024.2020.1746910},
      abstract = {This paper presents the outcomes of an exploratory study focused on the evaluation of an interactive music exergame for People with Dementia (PwD) and their caregivers. PwD tend to isolate themselves from the outside world, therefore carers need to develop strategies to maintain communication with them. Studies indicate that music–based activities provide an effective way to achieve social interaction with PwD. At the same time, physical activity plays a major role in dementia-related interventions because it can slow down progression and provide meaningful stimulation. Our developed interactive music game bounds these two concerns together; we evaluated the system afterwards regarding its individual and social impact and its integration into the daily routines of both PwD and their caregivers, focusing on its capacity to provide both enjoyment and relief from some of the effects of dementia. Qualitative data collected over 4 months confirmed the valuable impact of music-based interventions of PwD. Of particular note was how PwD used the game to improve or maintain their physical condition while recovering past memories and an interest in social interaction.},
      number = {0},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Human–Computer Interaction},
      author = {Unbehaun, David and Taugerbeck, Sebastian and Aal, Konstantin and Vaziri, Daryoush Daniel and Lehmann, Jasmin and Tolmie, Peter and Wieching, Rainer and Wulf, Volker},
      month = jun,
      year = {2020},
      note = {Publisher: Taylor \& Francis
      \_eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/07370024.2020.1746910},
      keywords = {exergame, participatory design, videogame, ICT, activity, care, Dementia, memories, music, reminiscence, social interaction, a-paper},
      pages = {1--34},
      }


    • Ertl, T., Aal, K., Diraoui, H., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2020)Psychosocial ICT: The Potential, Challenges and Benefits of Self-help Tools for Refugees with Negative Mental Stress

      doi:10.18420/ecscw2020_ep11
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has penetrated almost all areas of life today and has the potential to create positive change. This paper addresses the opportunities offered by ICT for improving the resilience and psychosocial well-being of refugees who have experienced mentally stressful events when forced to leave their home country and seek shelter in a different host country. We want to distinguish between perceived stress and clinically-defined trauma, for which therapeutic interventions require direct personal contact with psychological experts. However, we also want to focus on the digital possibilities that currently exist to support establishing this kind of personal connection. Many refugees need to seek psychological help, but social, economic and cultural barriers hold them back. Our qualitative study with refugees, psychologists and volunteers provides insights into how refugees deal with their mental issues and the challenges they face in everyday life. We aim to show that ICT can play a major role in terms of addressing awareness and self-empowerment as an entry point for this vulnerable group. We also discuss the potential challenges and benefits of ICT for refugees seeking to recover their mental stability.

      @article{ertl_psychosocial_2020,
      title = {Psychosocial {ICT}: {The} {Potential}, {Challenges} and {Benefits} of {Self}-help {Tools} for {Refugees} with {Negative} {Mental} {Stress}},
      issn = {2510-2591},
      shorttitle = {Psychosocial {ICT}},
      url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3404},
      doi = {10.18420/ecscw2020_ep11},
      abstract = {Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has penetrated almost all areas of life today and has the potential to create positive change. This paper addresses the opportunities offered by ICT for improving the resilience and psychosocial well-being of refugees who have experienced mentally stressful events when forced to leave their home country and seek shelter in a different host country. We want to distinguish between perceived stress and clinically-defined trauma, for which therapeutic interventions require direct personal contact with psychological experts. However, we also want to focus on the digital possibilities that currently exist to support establishing this kind of personal connection. Many refugees need to seek psychological help, but social, economic and cultural barriers hold them back. Our qualitative study with refugees, psychologists and volunteers provides insights into how refugees deal with their mental issues and the challenges they face in everyday life. We aim to show that ICT can play a major role in terms of addressing awareness and self-empowerment as an entry point for this vulnerable group. We also discuss the potential challenges and benefits of ICT for refugees seeking to recover their mental stability.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Aal, Konstantin and Diraoui, Hoda and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2020},
      note = {Accepted: 2020-06-05T23:52:33Z
      Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
      keywords = {italg},
      file = {Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\GTHNML3Z\\Ertl et al. - 2020 - Psychosocial ICT The Potential, Challenges and Be.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\GECPEFII\\3404.html:text/html},
      }


    • Li, Q., Tolmie, P., Weibert, A., Schorch, M., Müller, C. & Wulf, V. (2020)E-Portfolio: value tensions encountered in documenting design case studies

      IN Ethics and Information Technology, Pages: 5
      [BibTeX] [Abstract]

      We present here the “e-Portfolio” concept, which aims to provide access to documented design case studies of design researchers’ practices. Our e-Portfolio has its origins in Grounded Design. We examine here how the e-Portfolio concept grew out of Grounded Design, the way it instantiates values, and how it contributes to our understanding of the ways in which shifting values in practice can have an impact beyond the individual.

      @article{li_e-portfolio_2020,
      title = {E-{Portfolio}: value tensions encountered in documenting design case studies},
      abstract = {We present here the “e-Portfolio” concept, which aims to provide access to documented design case studies of design researchers’ practices. Our e-Portfolio has its origins in Grounded Design. We examine here how the e-Portfolio concept grew out of Grounded Design, the way it instantiates values, and how it contributes to our understanding of the ways in which shifting values in practice can have an impact beyond the individual.},
      language = {en},
      journal = {Ethics and Information Technology},
      author = {Li, Qinyu and Tolmie, Peter and Weibert, Anne and Schorch, Marén and Müller, Claudia and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {italg},
      pages = {5},
      file = {Li - E-Portfolio value tensions encountered in documen.pdf:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\68LQRU5Q\\Li - E-Portfolio value tensions encountered in documen.pdf:application/pdf},
      }

    2019


    • Ertl, T., Taugerbeck, S., Esau, M., Aal, K., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2019)The Social Mile – How (Psychosocial) ICT can Help to Promote Resocialization and to Overcome Prison

      IN Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 3, Pages: 248:1–248:31 doi:10.1145/3370270
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.

      @article{ertl_social_2019,
      title = {The {Social} {Mile} - {How} ({Psychosocial}) {ICT} can {Help} to {Promote} {Resocialization} and to {Overcome} {Prison}},
      volume = {3},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3370270},
      doi = {10.1145/3370270},
      abstract = {There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.},
      number = {GROUP},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Taugerbeck, Sebastian and Esau, Margarita and Aal, Konstantin and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      month = dec,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {cscw, qualitative research, italg, ai-infused, digital participation, prison, prisoners, psychosocial ict, smart mirror, social participation, voice-based technology},
      pages = {248:1--248:31},
      file = {Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\Y25WB53I\\Ertl et al. - 2019 - The Social Mile - How (Psychosocial) ICT can Help .pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Hoffmann, S., de Carvalho, A. F. P., Abele, D., Schweitzer, M., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2019)Cyber-Physical Systems for Knowledge and Expertise Sharing in Manufacturing Contexts: Towards a Model Enabling Design

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Vol. 28, Pages: 469–509 doi:10.1007/s10606-019-09355-y
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are currently attracting a great deal of attention as a part of the discourse surrounding the fourth industrial revolution. Thus far, the chief focus has been upon complex architectures for supply chain-wide data exchange between intelligent machines. Here, however, we take a very different tack by examining the support CPS may offer for the exchange and acquisition of knowledge-intensive human practices in the context of manual set-up processes on modern production machines. The paper offers contributions to both CSCW and the ongoing development of CPS in three ways. Firstly, it presents a detailed empirical study of knowledge and expertise sharing practices in a production environment. Secondly, the results of this study are used as the basis of an over-arching model that was developed with the express purpose of facilitating design. Finally, CPS-based technical possibilities are matched to the practice-relevant knowledge and expertise sharing requirements captured within the model.

      @article{hoffmann_cyber-physical_2019,
      title = {Cyber-{Physical} {Systems} for {Knowledge} and {Expertise} {Sharing} in {Manufacturing} {Contexts}: {Towards} a {Model} {Enabling} {Design}},
      volume = {28},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      shorttitle = {Cyber-{Physical} {Systems} for {Knowledge} and {Expertise} {Sharing} in {Manufacturing} {Contexts}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-019-09355-y},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-019-09355-y},
      abstract = {Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are currently attracting a great deal of attention as a part of the discourse surrounding the fourth industrial revolution. Thus far, the chief focus has been upon complex architectures for supply chain-wide data exchange between intelligent machines. Here, however, we take a very different tack by examining the support CPS may offer for the exchange and acquisition of knowledge-intensive human practices in the context of manual set-up processes on modern production machines. The paper offers contributions to both CSCW and the ongoing development of CPS in three ways. Firstly, it presents a detailed empirical study of knowledge and expertise sharing practices in a production environment. Secondly, the results of this study are used as the basis of an over-arching model that was developed with the express purpose of facilitating design. Finally, CPS-based technical possibilities are matched to the practice-relevant knowledge and expertise sharing requirements captured within the model.},
      language = {en},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Hoffmann, Sven and de Carvalho, Aparecido Fabiano Pinatti and Abele, Darwin and Schweitzer, Marcus and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      month = jun,
      year = {2019},
      pages = {469--509},
      file = {Springer Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\4NMD2SRT\\Hoffmann et al. - 2019 - Cyber-Physical Systems for Knowledge and Expertise.pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Mosconi, G., Li, Q., Randall, D., Karasti, H., Tolmie, P., Barutzky, J., Korn, M. & Pipek, V. (2019)Three Gaps in Opening Science

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Vol. 28, Pages: 749–789 doi:10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      The Open Science (OS) agenda has potentially massive cultural, organizational and infrastructural consequences. Ambitions for OS-driven policies have proliferated, within which researchers are expected to publish their scientific data. Significant research has been devoted to studying the issues associated with managing Open Research Data. Digital curation, as it is typically known, seeks to assess data management issues to ensure its long-term value and encourage secondary use. Hitherto, relatively little interest has been shown in examining the immense gap that exists between the OS grand vision and researchers’ actual data practices. Our specific contribution is to examine research data practices before systematic attempts at curation are made. We suggest that interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven contexts offer a perspicuous opportunity to understand the Data Curation and Research Data Management issues that can problematize uptake. These relate to obvious discrepancies between Open Research Data policies and subject-specific research practices and needs. Not least, it opens up questions about how data is constituted in different disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts. We present a detailed empirical account of interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven research contexts in order to clarify critical aspects of the OS agenda and how to realize its benefits, highlighting three gaps: between policy and practice, in knowledge, and in tool use and development.

      @article{mosconi_three_2019,
      title = {Three {Gaps} in {Opening} {Science}},
      volume = {28},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z},
      abstract = {The Open Science (OS) agenda has potentially massive cultural, organizational and infrastructural consequences. Ambitions for OS-driven policies have proliferated, within which researchers are expected to publish their scientific data. Significant research has been devoted to studying the issues associated with managing Open Research Data. Digital curation, as it is typically known, seeks to assess data management issues to ensure its long-term value and encourage secondary use. Hitherto, relatively little interest has been shown in examining the immense gap that exists between the OS grand vision and researchers’ actual data practices. Our specific contribution is to examine research data practices before systematic attempts at curation are made. We suggest that interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven contexts offer a perspicuous opportunity to understand the Data Curation and Research Data Management issues that can problematize uptake. These relate to obvious discrepancies between Open Research Data policies and subject-specific research practices and needs. Not least, it opens up questions about how data is constituted in different disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts. We present a detailed empirical account of interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven research contexts in order to clarify critical aspects of the OS agenda and how to realize its benefits, highlighting three gaps: between policy and practice, in knowledge, and in tool use and development.},
      language = {en},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Mosconi, Gaia and Li, Qinyu and Randall, Dave and Karasti, Helena and Tolmie, Peter and Barutzky, Jana and Korn, Matthias and Pipek, Volkmar},
      month = jun,
      year = {2019},
      pages = {749--789},
      file = {Springer Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\NENNZ557\\Mosconi et al. - 2019 - Three Gaps in Opening Science.pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Ludwig, T., Tolmie, P. & Pipek, V. (2019)From the Internet of Things to an Internet of Practices

      IN Social Internet of Things
      [BibTeX]

      @incollection{ludwig_internet_2019,
      title = {From the {Internet} of {Things} to an {Internet} of {Practices}},
      booktitle = {Social {Internet} of {Things}},
      publisher = {Springer},
      author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Tolmie, Peter and Pipek, Volkmar},
      year = {2019},
      pages = {33--47},
      }


    • Meurer, J., Lawo, D., Pakusch, C., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2019)Opportunities for Sustainable Mobility: Re-thinking Eco-feedback from a Citizen’s Perspective

      Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Communities & Technologies – Transforming Communities. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 102–113 doi:10.1145/3328320.3328391
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{meurer_opportunities_2019,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {C\&\#38;{T} '19},
      title = {Opportunities for {Sustainable} {Mobility}: {Re}-thinking {Eco}-feedback from a {Citizen}'s {Perspective}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7162-9},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3328320.3328391},
      doi = {10.1145/3328320.3328391},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 9th {International} {Conference} on {Communities} \& {Technologies} - {Transforming} {Communities}},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Meurer, Johanna and Lawo, Dennis and Pakusch, Christina and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {eco-feedback tools, interview study, mobile phone data, mobility, Sustainable mobility},
      pages = {102--113},
      }


    • Ahmadi, M., Weibert, A., Wenzelmann, V., Ertl, T., Randall, D., Tolmie, P., Wulf, V. & Marsden, N. (2019)Gender Factors and Feminist Values in Living Labs

      IN Loh, J. & Coeckelbergh, M. (Eds.), Feminist Philosophy of Technology Stuttgart doi:10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In this paper, we describe the feminist perspectives that have informed design in the HCI community, and develop an argument for an approach that translates these broad commitments into a pragmatic design space, drawing on emancipatory agendas such as participatory design. As designers of technologies, we regard creating research infrastructures that offer safe spaces for the development of user-centered artifacts based on diverse and critical perspectives as not only a utopian vision, but as a practical contribution to a more equal society. Shaowen Bardzell stresses this point when she states that in envisioning utopias, we are “seeking not so much to predict the future, but rather to imagine a radically better one”. Recognizing that technology shapes social life and amplifies social practices both good and bad, research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) increasingly focuses on how technology has been developed in the past, and how constructive futures may be envisaged. More and more, academics are inviting multidisciplinarity and embracing ethnographic methods as part of the design of networks and technical artifacts, realizing that innovation cannot be user-centered if designers employ a bird’s-eye perspective. This leads to an approach that advocates designing socially embedded technologies in real world environments. Thus, for some time now, collaboration and participatory design approaches have provided a means for enacting positive social and technological change. If we agree that “those who design technologies are […] designing society”, new questions arise in terms of responsibility for the future shape of the world: How do we design technologies to design a better society for people of all genders?

      @incollection{ahmadi_gender_2019,
      address = {Stuttgart},
      series = {Techno:{Phil} – {Aktuelle} {Herausforderungen} der {Technikphilosophie}},
      title = {Gender {Factors} and {Feminist} {Values} in {Living} {Labs}},
      isbn = {978-3-476-04967-4},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9},
      abstract = {In this paper, we describe the feminist perspectives that have informed design in the HCI community, and develop an argument for an approach that translates these broad commitments into a pragmatic design space, drawing on emancipatory agendas such as participatory design. As designers of technologies, we regard creating research infrastructures that offer safe spaces for the development of user-centered artifacts based on diverse and critical perspectives as not only a utopian vision, but as a practical contribution to a more equal society. Shaowen Bardzell stresses this point when she states that in envisioning utopias, we are “seeking not so much to predict the future, but rather to imagine a radically better one”. Recognizing that technology shapes social life and amplifies social practices both good and bad, research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) increasingly focuses on how technology has been developed in the past, and how constructive futures may be envisaged. More and more, academics are inviting multidisciplinarity and embracing ethnographic methods as part of the design of networks and technical artifacts, realizing that innovation cannot be user-centered if designers employ a bird’s-eye perspective. This leads to an approach that advocates designing socially embedded technologies in real world environments. Thus, for some time now, collaboration and participatory design approaches have provided a means for enacting positive social and technological change. If we agree that “those who design technologies are […] designing society”, new questions arise in terms of responsibility for the future shape of the world: How do we design technologies to design a better society for people of all genders?},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Feminist {Philosophy} of {Technology}},
      publisher = {J.B. Metzler},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Weibert, Anne and Wenzelmann, Victoria and Ertl, Tanja and Randall, Dave and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker and Marsden, Nicola},
      editor = {Loh, Janina and Coeckelbergh, Mark},
      year = {2019},
      doi = {10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9},
      keywords = {italg},
      pages = {167--183},
      file = {Springer Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\PYG5A2AF\\Ahmadi et al. - 2019 - Gender Factors and Feminist Values in Living Labs.pdf:application/pdf},
      }

    2018


    • de Carvalho, A. F. P., Hoffmann, S., Abele, D., Schweitzer, M., Tolmie, P., Randall, D. & Wulf, V. (2018)Of Embodied Action and Sensors: Knowledge and Expertise Sharing in Industrial Set-Up

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Vol. 27, Pages: 875–916 doi:10.1007/s10606-018-9320-6
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Knowledge and expertise sharing has long been an important theme in CSCW and, importantly, one that has frequently challenged a prevailing view concerning knowledge management. This critique focused, initially, on the practical problems associated with issues of Organisational Memory (OM), and in particular the difficulties inherent in an oversimplified ‘repository’ model. Attention then turned to issues of contextuality and communication for expertise sharing, drawing on concepts such as communities of practice and social capital to understand, again, the sharing of knowledge and expertise in practice. Here, we report on how particular kinds of ‘embodied action’ can be identified in relation to the potential of cyber-physical infrastructures for knowledge sharing in an industrial context. We argue that, in a complex industrial domain, both the recording of physical movement – ‘showing’ – and the representation of local knowledge – ‘telling’ – are potentially relevant. Our proposal is that the evolution of cyber-physical infrastructures now offers a way of changing some early assumptions about how knowledge might be captured and displayed. We argue that we are entering a third generation of knowledge and expertise sharing research, where the use of augmented reality (AR) and sensor technology will result in significant new methodological innovations, including the capture and sharing of knowledge, embedded in embodied action.

      @article{de_carvalho_embodied_2018,
      title = {Of {Embodied} {Action} and {Sensors}: {Knowledge} and {Expertise} {Sharing} in {Industrial} {Set}-{Up}},
      volume = {27},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      shorttitle = {Of {Embodied} {Action} and {Sensors}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-018-9320-6},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-018-9320-6},
      abstract = {Knowledge and expertise sharing has long been an important theme in CSCW and, importantly, one that has frequently challenged a prevailing view concerning knowledge management. This critique focused, initially, on the practical problems associated with issues of Organisational Memory (OM), and in particular the difficulties inherent in an oversimplified ‘repository’ model. Attention then turned to issues of contextuality and communication for expertise sharing, drawing on concepts such as communities of practice and social capital to understand, again, the sharing of knowledge and expertise in practice. Here, we report on how particular kinds of ‘embodied action’ can be identified in relation to the potential of cyber-physical infrastructures for knowledge sharing in an industrial context. We argue that, in a complex industrial domain, both the recording of physical movement – ‘showing’ – and the representation of local knowledge – ‘telling’ – are potentially relevant. Our proposal is that the evolution of cyber-physical infrastructures now offers a way of changing some early assumptions about how knowledge might be captured and displayed. We argue that we are entering a third generation of knowledge and expertise sharing research, where the use of augmented reality (AR) and sensor technology will result in significant new methodological innovations, including the capture and sharing of knowledge, embedded in embodied action.},
      language = {en},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {de Carvalho, Aparecido Fabiano Pinatti and Hoffmann, Sven and Abele, Darwin and Schweitzer, Marcus and Tolmie, Peter and Randall, David and Wulf, Volker},
      month = dec,
      year = {2018},
      pages = {875--916},
      file = {Springer Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\XHVMNXMF\\de Carvalho et al. - 2018 - Of Embodied Action and Sensors Knowledge and Expe.pdf:application/pdf},
      }


    • Ludwig, T., Pipek, V. & Tolmie, P. (2018)Designing for Collaborative Infrastructuring: Supporting Resonance Activities

      IN Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact., Vol. 2, Pages: 113:1–113:29 doi:10.1145/3274382
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{ludwig_designing_2018,
      title = {Designing for {Collaborative} {Infrastructuring}: {Supporting} {Resonance} {Activities}},
      volume = {2},
      issn = {2573-0142},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3274382},
      doi = {10.1145/3274382},
      number = {CSCW},
      journal = {Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact.},
      author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Pipek, Volkmar and Tolmie, Peter},
      month = nov,
      year = {2018},
      keywords = {cscw, appropriation, infrastructuring, resonance activities, sociable technologies},
      pages = {113:1--113:29},
      annote = {Place: New York, NY, USA Publisher: ACM},
      }


    • Unbehaun, D., Aal, K., Vaziri, D. D., Wieching, R., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2018)Facilitating Collaboration and Social Experiences with Videogames in Dementia: Results and Implications from a Participatory Design Study

      IN Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact., Vol. 2, Pages: 175:1–175:23 doi:10.1145/3274444
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{unbehaun_facilitating_2018,
      title = {Facilitating {Collaboration} and {Social} {Experiences} with {Videogames} in {Dementia}: {Results} and {Implications} from a {Participatory} {Design} {Study}},
      volume = {2},
      issn = {2573-0142},
      url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3274444},
      doi = {10.1145/3274444},
      number = {CSCW},
      journal = {Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact.},
      author = {Unbehaun, David and Aal, Konstantin and Vaziri, Daryoush Daniel and Wieching, Rainer and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      month = nov,
      year = {2018},
      keywords = {A-Paper, dementia, exergame, ict, participatory design, qualitative research, videogame},
      pages = {175:1--175:23},
      annote = {Place: New York, NY, USA Publisher: ACM},
      }


    • Jakobi, T., Stevens, G., Castelli, N., Ogonowski, C., Schaub, F., Vindice, N., Randall, D., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2018)Evolving Needs in IoT Control and Accountability: A Longitudinal Study on Smart Home Intelligibility

      IN Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies, Vol. 2, Pages: 28 doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3287049
      [BibTeX]

      @article{jakobi_evolving_2018,
      title = {Evolving {Needs} in {IoT} {Control} and {Accountability}: {A} {Longitudinal} {Study} on {Smart} {Home} {Intelligibility}},
      volume = {2},
      doi = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3287049},
      number = {4},
      journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies},
      author = {Jakobi, Timo and Stevens, Gunnar and Castelli, Nico and Ogonowski, Corinna and Schaub, Florian and Vindice, Nils and Randall, Dave and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2018},
      pages = {28},
      }


    • Unbehaun, D., Vaziri, D. D., Aal, K., Wieching, R., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2018)Exploring the Potential of Exergames to affect the Social and Daily Life of People with Dementia and their Caregivers

      Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems., Publisher: ACM, Pages: 62
      [BibTeX]

      @inproceedings{unbehaun_exploring_2018,
      title = {Exploring the {Potential} of {Exergames} to affect the {Social} and {Daily} {Life} of {People} with {Dementia} and their {Caregivers}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2018 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Unbehaun, David and Vaziri, Daryoush Daniel and Aal, Konstantin and Wieching, Rainer and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2018},
      keywords = {A-Paper},
      pages = {62},
      }


    • Aal, K., Rüller, S., Holdermann, S., Tolmie, P., Rohde, M., Zillinger, M. & Wulf, V. (2018)Challenges of an Educational ICT Intervention: The Establishment of a MediaSpace in the High Atlas

      IN ECSCW 2003 Dordrecht doi:10.1007/978-94-010-0068-0_1
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      This paper describes the challenges which were faced by establishing a MediaSpace in the High Atlas in Morocco. The focus lies on the adaption of the wellestablished computer club approach within a steadily developing and profoundly transforming rural/mountainous region. This paper presents different aspects during the establishment process and contrasts these experiences with two other studies in different contexts, on the one hand inhabitants of refugee camps in Palestine and on the other hand, socially marginalized migrants in Germany. Findings show the importance of understanding the local context, involving local partners and integrating the needs and requirements of the local population to establish a sustainable intervention.

      @incollection{aal_challenges_2018,
      address = {Dordrecht},
      title = {Challenges of an {Educational} {ICT} {Intervention}: {The} {Establishment} of a {MediaSpace} in the {High} {Atlas}},
      isbn = {978-94-010-3994-9 978-94-010-0068-0},
      shorttitle = {Pruning the {Answer} {Garden}},
      url = {http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-94-010-0068-0_1},
      abstract = {This paper describes the challenges which were faced by establishing a MediaSpace in the High Atlas in Morocco. The focus lies on the adaption of the wellestablished computer club approach within a steadily developing and profoundly transforming rural/mountainous region. This paper presents different aspects during the establishment process and contrasts these experiences with two other studies in different contexts, on the one hand inhabitants of refugee camps in Palestine and on the other hand, socially marginalized migrants in Germany. Findings show the importance of understanding the local context, involving local partners and integrating the needs and requirements of the local population to establish a sustainable intervention.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {{ECSCW} 2003},
      publisher = {Springer Netherlands},
      author = {Aal, Konstantin and Rüller, Sarah and Holdermann, Simon and Tolmie, Peter and Rohde, Markus and Zillinger, Martin and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2018},
      doi = {10.1007/978-94-010-0068-0_1},
      pages = {1--20},
      file = {Pipek und Wulf - 2003 - Pruning the Answer Garden Knowledge Sharing in Ma.pdf:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\754MHDBA\\Pipek und Wulf - 2003 - Pruning the Answer Garden Knowledge Sharing in Ma.pdf:application/pdf},
      }

    2017


    • Mosconi, G., Korn, M., Reuter, C., Tolmie, P., Teli, M. & Pipek, V. (2017)From Facebook to the Neighbourhood: Infrastructuring of Hybrid Community Engagement

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Vol. 26, Pages: 959–1003 doi:10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In recent years, social media have increased the resources that individuals and organizations are able to mobilize for the development of socially innovative practices. In this article, we engage with a naturally occurring development in a Trentinian neighbourhood to examine the cooperative interactions amongst members of a local community. The first author and local residents of the neighbourhood participated in online discussions, decision making, and physical activities that led to material changes in the area. The interventions are motivated by and based on the concept of Social Street that combines online interactions in a closed Facebook group with face-to-face meetings seeking to practically engage the collective in accomplishing certain immediate or ongoing needs. Over the course of two years, we studied this local instantiation of Social Street in Trento, Italy by way of an action-oriented (digital) ethnography. Through this work, we demonstrate how urban neighbourhoods might benefit from hybrid forms of community engagement that are enacted through a constant back and forth between online and face-to-face interactions. We further argue that the infrastructuring of local urban collectives should follow strategies that pay attention to the multiple issues in urban neighbourhoods and people’s attachments to them. Overall, the paper reflects upon the challenges and configurations of participation that this form of community-work entails.

      @article{mosconi_facebook_2017,
      title = {From {Facebook} to the {Neighbourhood}: {Infrastructuring} of {Hybrid} {Community} {Engagement}},
      volume = {26},
      url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z},
      abstract = {In recent years, social media have increased the resources that individuals and organizations are able to mobilize for the development of socially innovative practices. In this article, we engage with a naturally occurring development in a Trentinian neighbourhood to examine the cooperative interactions amongst members of a local community. The first author and local residents of the neighbourhood participated in online discussions, decision making, and physical activities that led to material changes in the area. The interventions are motivated by and based on the concept of Social Street that combines online interactions in a closed Facebook group with face-to-face meetings seeking to practically engage the collective in accomplishing certain immediate or ongoing needs. Over the course of two years, we studied this local instantiation of Social Street in Trento, Italy by way of an action-oriented (digital) ethnography. Through this work, we demonstrate how urban neighbourhoods might benefit from hybrid forms of community engagement that are enacted through a constant back and forth between online and face-to-face interactions. We further argue that the infrastructuring of local urban collectives should follow strategies that pay attention to the multiple issues in urban neighbourhoods and people's attachments to them. Overall, the paper reflects upon the challenges and configurations of participation that this form of community-work entails.},
      number = {4-6},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
      author = {Mosconi, Gaia and Korn, Matthias and Reuter, Christian and Tolmie, Peter and Teli, Maurizio and Pipek, Volkmar},
      year = {2017},
      keywords = {CSCW, HCI, A-Paper, SMO, KOKOS, HyServ},
      pages = {959--1003},
      }