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    Florian Jasche

    florian.jasche(at)uni-siegen.de

    Room: US-D 113

    Phone: +49 271 740-4396

    Publications

    2022


    • Krings, K., Weber, P., Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2022)FADER: An Authoring Tool for Creating Augmented Reality-Based Avatars from an End-User Perspective

      IN Mensch und Computer 2022 – Tagungsband doi:10.1145/3543758.3543778
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Although augmented reality (AR) is becoming more common in our society, there are few specialized end-user tools for appropriate AR content creation. Most tools are focused on creating entire 3D applications or require extensive knowledge in programming and 3D modeling. With reference to End-User Development (EUD), we present a design case study for an end-user-friendly authoring tool that allows domain experts to create individual AR avatars in the field of Human-Food Interaction. After reviewing current approaches and design guidelines, we designed and implemented FADER, a web-based tool for creating AR-based food avatars. Our evaluation shows that playful design fosters immersion, and that abstract placeholders and highly simplified controls empower non-developers to create AR content. Our study contributes to a better understanding of end-user needs and practices during the AR creation process and informs the design of future AR authoring tools.

      @article{krings_fader_2022,
      title = {{FADER}: {An} {Authoring} {Tool} for {Creating} {Augmented} {Reality}-{Based} {Avatars} from an {End}-{User} {Perspective}},
      shorttitle = {{FADER}},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/39249},
      doi = {10.1145/3543758.3543778},
      abstract = {Although augmented reality (AR) is becoming more common in our society, there are few specialized end-user tools for appropriate AR content creation. Most tools are focused on creating entire 3D applications or require extensive knowledge in programming and 3D modeling. With reference to End-User Development (EUD), we present a design case study for an end-user-friendly authoring tool that allows domain experts to create individual AR avatars in the field of Human-Food Interaction. After reviewing current approaches and design guidelines, we designed and implemented FADER, a web-based tool for creating AR-based food avatars. Our evaluation shows that playful design fosters immersion, and that abstract placeholders and highly simplified controls empower non-developers to create AR content. Our study contributes to a better understanding of end-user needs and practices during the AR creation process and informs the design of future AR authoring tools.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2022-09-12},
      journal = {Mensch und Computer 2022 - Tagungsband},
      author = {Krings, Kevin and Weber, Philip and Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = sep,
      year = {2022},
      note = {Accepted: 2022-08-31T09:43:01Z
      Publisher: ACM},
      }


    • Hoffmann, S., Ludwig, T., Jasche, F., Wulf, V. & Randall, D. (2022)RetrofittAR: Supporting Hardware-Centered Expertise Sharing in Manufacturing Settings through Augmented Reality

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) doi:10.1007/s10606-022-09430-x
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Since almost the onset of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), the community has been concerned with how expertise sharing can be supported in different settings. Here, the complex handling of machines based on experience and knowledge is increasingly becoming a challenge. In our study, we investigated expertise sharing in a medium-sized manufacturing company in an effort to support the fostering of hardware-based expertise sharing by using augmented reality (AR) to ‘retrofit’ machines. We, therefore, conducted a preliminary empirical study to understand how expertise is shared in practice and what current support is available. Based on the findings, we derived design challenges and implications for the design of AR systems in manufacturing settings. The main challenges, we found, had to do with existing socio-technical infrastructure and the contextual nature of expertise. We implemented a HoloLens application called RetrofittAR that supports learning on the production machine during actual use. We evaluated the system during the company’s actual production process. The results show which data types are necessary to support expertise sharing and how our design supports the retrofitting of old machines. We contribute to the current state of research in two ways. First, we present the knowledge-intensive practice of operating older production machines through novel AR interfaces. Second, we outline how retrofitting measures with new visualisation technologies can support knowledge-intensive production processes.

      @article{hoffmann_retrofittar_2022,
      title = {{RetrofittAR}: {Supporting} {Hardware}-{Centered} {Expertise} {Sharing} in {Manufacturing} {Settings} through {Augmented} {Reality}},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      shorttitle = {{RetrofittAR}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-022-09430-x},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-022-09430-x},
      abstract = {Since almost the onset of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), the community has been concerned with how expertise sharing can be supported in different settings. Here, the complex handling of machines based on experience and knowledge is increasingly becoming a challenge. In our study, we investigated expertise sharing in a medium-sized manufacturing company in an effort to support the fostering of hardware-based expertise sharing by using augmented reality (AR) to ‘retrofit’ machines. We, therefore, conducted a preliminary empirical study to understand how expertise is shared in practice and what current support is available. Based on the findings, we derived design challenges and implications for the design of AR systems in manufacturing settings. The main challenges, we found, had to do with existing socio-technical infrastructure and the contextual nature of expertise. We implemented a HoloLens application called RetrofittAR that supports learning on the production machine during actual use. We evaluated the system during the company’s actual production process. The results show which data types are necessary to support expertise sharing and how our design supports the retrofitting of old machines. We contribute to the current state of research in two ways. First, we present the knowledge-intensive practice of operating older production machines through novel AR interfaces. Second, we outline how retrofitting measures with new visualisation technologies can support knowledge-intensive production processes.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2022-07-01},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Hoffmann, Sven and Ludwig, Thomas and Jasche, Florian and Wulf, Volker and Randall, David},
      month = jun,
      year = {2022},
      keywords = {CSCW, Expertise Sharing, Augmented Reality, Manufacturing, Retrofit},
      }


    • Dilling, F., Jasche, F., Ludwig, T. & Witzke, I. (2022)Physische Arbeitsmittel durch Augmented Reality erweitern – Eine Fallstudie zu dreidimensionalen Koordinatenmodellen

      IN Dilling, F., Pielsticker, F. & Witzke, I. (Eds.), Neue Perspektiven auf mathematische Lehr-Lernprozesse mit digitalen Medien: Eine Auswahl grundlagenorientierter und praxisorientierter Beiträge Wiesbaden doi:10.1007/978-3-658-36764-0_13
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Die Vorstellung von und der Umgang mit Geraden und Ebenen im dreidimensionalen Raum ist für viele Schülerinnen und Schüler der Oberstufe eine große Herausforderung. Projektionen dieser Objekte des dreidimensionalen Raumes auf zweidimensionale Medien wie Papier, Tafel oder Computerbildschirme helfen bei diesem Problem nur selten. Auf Basis eines dreidimensionalen Koordinatensystems als physisches Arbeitsmittel können die Objekte allerdings begreifbar gemacht und unverzerrt dargestellt werden.

      @incollection{dilling_physische_2022,
      address = {Wiesbaden},
      series = {{MINTUS} – {Beiträge} zur mathematisch-naturwissenschaftlichen {Bildung}},
      title = {Physische {Arbeitsmittel} durch {Augmented} {Reality} erweitern – {Eine} {Fallstudie} zu dreidimensionalen {Koordinatenmodellen}},
      isbn = {978-3-658-36764-0},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-36764-0_13},
      abstract = {Die Vorstellung von und der Umgang mit Geraden und Ebenen im dreidimensionalen Raum ist für viele Schülerinnen und Schüler der Oberstufe eine große Herausforderung. Projektionen dieser Objekte des dreidimensionalen Raumes auf zweidimensionale Medien wie Papier, Tafel oder Computerbildschirme helfen bei diesem Problem nur selten. Auf Basis eines dreidimensionalen Koordinatensystems als physisches Arbeitsmittel können die Objekte allerdings begreifbar gemacht und unverzerrt dargestellt werden.},
      language = {de},
      urldate = {2022-06-01},
      booktitle = {Neue {Perspektiven} auf mathematische {Lehr}-{Lernprozesse} mit digitalen {Medien}: {Eine} {Auswahl} grundlagenorientierter und praxisorientierter {Beiträge}},
      publisher = {Springer Fachmedien},
      author = {Dilling, Frederik and Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas and Witzke, Ingo},
      editor = {Dilling, Frederik and Pielsticker, Felicitas and Witzke, Ingo},
      year = {2022},
      doi = {10.1007/978-3-658-36764-0_13},
      pages = {289--306},
      }

    2021


    • Krauß, V., Jasche, F., Saßmannshausen, S. M., Ludwig, T. & Boden, A. (2021)Research and Practice Recommendations for Mixed Reality Design &\#x2013; Different Perspectives from the Community

      Proceedings of the 27th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–13 doi:10.1145/3489849.3489876
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Over the last decades, different kinds of design guides have been created to maintain consistency and usability in interactive system development. However, in the case of spatial applications, practitioners from research and industry either have difficulty finding them or perceive such guides as lacking relevance, practicability, and applicability. This paper presents the current state of scientific research and industry practice by investigating currently used design recommendations for mixed reality (MR) system development. We analyzed and compared 875 design recommendations for MR applications elicited from 89 scientific papers and documentation from six industry practitioners in a literature review. In doing so, we identified differences regarding four key topics: Focus on unique MR design challenges, abstraction regarding devices and ecosystems, level of detail and abstraction of content, and covered topics. Based on that, we contribute to the MR design research by providing three factors for perceived irrelevance and six main implications for design recommendations that are applicable in scientific and industry practice.

      @inproceedings{kraus_research_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{VRST} '21},
      title = {Research and {Practice} {Recommendations} for {Mixed} {Reality} {Design} \&\#x2013; {Different} {Perspectives} from the {Community}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9092-7},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3489849.3489876},
      doi = {10.1145/3489849.3489876},
      abstract = {Over the last decades, different kinds of design guides have been created to maintain consistency and usability in interactive system development. However, in the case of spatial applications, practitioners from research and industry either have difficulty finding them or perceive such guides as lacking relevance, practicability, and applicability. This paper presents the current state of scientific research and industry practice by investigating currently used design recommendations for mixed reality (MR) system development. We analyzed and compared 875 design recommendations for MR applications elicited from 89 scientific papers and documentation from six industry practitioners in a literature review. In doing so, we identified differences regarding four key topics: Focus on unique MR design challenges, abstraction regarding devices and ecosystems, level of detail and abstraction of content, and covered topics. Based on that, we contribute to the MR design research by providing three factors for perceived irrelevance and six main implications for design recommendations that are applicable in scientific and industry practice.},
      urldate = {2022-02-08},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 27th {ACM} {Symposium} on {Virtual} {Reality} {Software} and {Technology}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Krauß, Veronika and Jasche, Florian and Saßmannshausen, Sheree May and Ludwig, Thomas and Boden, Alexander},
      month = dec,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Design Recommendations, Design Theory and Practice, Guidelines, User Interface Design},
      pages = {1--13},
      }


    • Hoffmann, S., Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2021)Reflections on a Comparative AR Study

      , Publisher: IEEE Computer Society, Pages: 106–108 doi:10.1109/ISMAR-Adjunct54149.2021.00031
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      A variety of studies exist that design innovative interactions based on augmented reality (AR). Comparing them often involves examining their laboratory studies. However, since AR has a high context dependency (e.g., reference to the real environment), it is important to emphasize that existing literature do not reveal generalizable results regarding how to design AR instructions. Within this paper, we argue that it is time to open up new use cases and test appropriation mechanisms in practice with the help of long-term studies to build a base for the comparison of AR-based interactions. Such a repository built up with long-term studies has the potential to define valid insights for future developments in the AR environment.

      @inproceedings{hoffmann_reflections_2021,
      title = {Reflections on a {Comparative} {AR} {Study}},
      isbn = {978-1-66541-298-8},
      url = {https://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings-article/ismar-adjunct/2021/129800a106/1yeQDjpkbXW},
      doi = {10.1109/ISMAR-Adjunct54149.2021.00031},
      abstract = {A variety of studies exist that design innovative interactions based on augmented reality (AR). Comparing them often involves examining their laboratory studies. However, since AR has a high context dependency (e.g., reference to the real environment), it is important to emphasize that existing literature do not reveal generalizable results regarding how to design AR instructions. Within this paper, we argue that it is time to open up new use cases and test appropriation mechanisms in practice with the help of long-term studies to build a base for the comparison of AR-based interactions. Such a repository built up with long-term studies has the potential to define valid insights for future developments in the AR environment.},
      language = {English},
      urldate = {2021-11-10},
      publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
      author = {Hoffmann, Sven and Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = oct,
      year = {2021},
      pages = {106--108},
      }


    • Liu, S., Harun, S. E., Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2021)Supporting the Onboarding of 3D Printers through Conversational Agents

      Mensch und Computer 2021. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 494–498 doi:10.1145/3473856.3474010
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In view of its capacity to create physical objects for a wide range of different potential applications, 3D printing has become increasingly popular over the years. However, given its scope of application, 3D printing can be challenging. Novice users often need assistance from experts, who are not always available. Recent interest in the development of conversational agents opens up the possibility of assisting novice users in their interactions with 3D printers, thus improving their experience. In this paper, we illustrate a potential concept of a conversational agent and present a prototype of a Telegram chatbot to improve the user experience of 3D printing.

      @inproceedings{liu_supporting_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{MuC} '21},
      title = {Supporting the {Onboarding} of {3D} {Printers} through {Conversational} {Agents}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-8645-6},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3473856.3474010},
      doi = {10.1145/3473856.3474010},
      abstract = {In view of its capacity to create physical objects for a wide range of different potential applications, 3D printing has become increasingly popular over the years. However, given its scope of application, 3D printing can be challenging. Novice users often need assistance from experts, who are not always available. Recent interest in the development of conversational agents opens up the possibility of assisting novice users in their interactions with 3D printers, thus improving their experience. In this paper, we illustrate a potential concept of a conversational agent and present a prototype of a Telegram chatbot to improve the user experience of 3D printing.},
      urldate = {2021-09-14},
      booktitle = {Mensch und {Computer} 2021},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Liu, Shi and Harun, Shahrier Erfan and Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = sep,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Conversational Agents, 3D Printing, Human-Machine Interface, Internet-of-Things},
      pages = {494--498},
      }


    • Jasche, F., Kirchhübel, J., Ludwig, T. & Tolmie, P. (2021)BeamLite: Diminishing Ecological Fractures of Remote Collaboration through Mixed Reality Environments

      C&T ’21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies – Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 200–211 doi:10.1145/3461564.3461566
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Developing systems to support remote collaboration usually involves creating new environments in which non-co-located participants produce actions that are, at least in part, accessible to one another. However, this typically fractures the relationship between those actions and the sense of a shared environment, engendering difficulties that can render even the simplest of activities problematic. This becomes more pronounced as the activities become more complex and involve physical artifacts. Although mixed reality seems to offer promising ways of overcoming these troubles, there is still a risk of replicating the fractured ecology problem. We report on an empirical study and the development of a mixed reality prototype called BeamLite that seeks to bypass such issues by providing participants with the illusion of them sharing a single familiar place. Although our evaluation revealed possibilities for evading some troubles associated with artifact-focused remote collaboration, it exposed the need for virtual toolboxes that dynamically support specific work practices and the importance of virtual artifacts embedded within the physical environment to further diminish the sense of ecological fracture.

      @inproceedings{jasche_beamlite_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {C\&{T} '21},
      title = {{BeamLite}: {Diminishing} {Ecological} {Fractures} of {Remote} {Collaboration} through {Mixed} {Reality} {Environments}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9056-9},
      shorttitle = {{BeamLite}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3461564.3461566},
      doi = {10.1145/3461564.3461566},
      abstract = {Developing systems to support remote collaboration usually involves creating new environments in which non-co-located participants produce actions that are, at least in part, accessible to one another. However, this typically fractures the relationship between those actions and the sense of a shared environment, engendering difficulties that can render even the simplest of activities problematic. This becomes more pronounced as the activities become more complex and involve physical artifacts. Although mixed reality seems to offer promising ways of overcoming these troubles, there is still a risk of replicating the fractured ecology problem. We report on an empirical study and the development of a mixed reality prototype called BeamLite that seeks to bypass such issues by providing participants with the illusion of them sharing a single familiar place. Although our evaluation revealed possibilities for evading some troubles associated with artifact-focused remote collaboration, it exposed the need for virtual toolboxes that dynamically support specific work practices and the importance of virtual artifacts embedded within the physical environment to further diminish the sense of ecological fracture.},
      urldate = {2021-09-23},
      booktitle = {C\&{T} '21: {Proceedings} of the 10th {International} {Conference} on {Communities} \& {Technologies} - {Wicked} {Problems} in the {Age} of {Tech}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Kirchhübel, Jasmin and Ludwig, Thomas and Tolmie, Peter},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Remote Collaboration, Unfractured Ecologies, Virtual Reality},
      pages = {200--211},
      }


    • Jasche, F., Hoffmann, S., Ludwig, T. & Wulf, V. (2021)Comparison of Different Types of Augmented Reality Visualizations for Instructions.

      CHI ’21: Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Yokohama, Japan, Publisher: ACM, New York, NY, USA, Pages: 1–13 doi:10.1145/3411764.3445724
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{jasche_comparison_2021,
      address = {Yokohama, Japan},
      title = {Comparison of {Different} {Types} of {Augmented} {Reality} {Visualizations} for {Instructions}.},
      url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411764.3445724},
      doi = {10.1145/3411764.3445724},
      booktitle = {{CHI} '21: {Proceedings} of the 2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {ACM, New York, NY, USA},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Hoffmann, Sven and Ludwig, Thomas and Wulf, Volker},
      month = may,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {a-paper},
      pages = {1--13},
      }

    2020


    • Ludwig, T., Hoffmann, S., Jasche, F. & Ruhrmann, M. (2020)VacuumCleanAR: augmented reality-based self-explanatory physical artifacts

      Proceedings of the Conference on Mensch und Computer. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 291–302 doi:10.1145/3404983.3405526
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Consumer purchase decisions are not only determined by the quality or price of a product. Customers also want an innovative product that they can identify with in something more than just a functional way. Much of this appeal is often bound up with the innovative character of a product. However, the global market and the huge variety of products available make it challenging for companies to help customers understand the particular innovations in their products, especially in terms of technical “hidden” innovations. Augmented reality (AR) offers interactive experiences in real-world environments through digitalized information. In this paper, we present a design case study about an AR-based approach to reveal the hidden innovations to potential users in an engaging and “emotional” way by using the example of a vacuum cleaner. Based on an empirical study, we designed and implemented the fully functional HoloLens application VacuumCleanAR, which allows users to discover the hidden innovations of a vacuum cleaner in a less functional and more consumer-centric way. This reveals the scope for augmenting other physical artifacts in a similar fashion.

      @inproceedings{ludwig_vacuumcleanar_2020,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{MuC} '20},
      title = {{VacuumCleanAR}: augmented reality-based self-explanatory physical artifacts},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7540-5},
      shorttitle = {{VacuumCleanAR}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3404983.3405526},
      doi = {10.1145/3404983.3405526},
      abstract = {Consumer purchase decisions are not only determined by the quality or price of a product. Customers also want an innovative product that they can identify with in something more than just a functional way. Much of this appeal is often bound up with the innovative character of a product. However, the global market and the huge variety of products available make it challenging for companies to help customers understand the particular innovations in their products, especially in terms of technical "hidden" innovations. Augmented reality (AR) offers interactive experiences in real-world environments through digitalized information. In this paper, we present a design case study about an AR-based approach to reveal the hidden innovations to potential users in an engaging and "emotional" way by using the example of a vacuum cleaner. Based on an empirical study, we designed and implemented the fully functional HoloLens application VacuumCleanAR, which allows users to discover the hidden innovations of a vacuum cleaner in a less functional and more consumer-centric way. This reveals the scope for augmenting other physical artifacts in a similar fashion.},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {Conference} on {Mensch} und {Computer}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Hoffmann, Sven and Jasche, Florian and Ruhrmann, Marius},
      month = sep,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {design case study, augmented reality, hololens, marketing},
      pages = {291--302},
      }


    • Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2020)PrintARface: Supporting the Exploration of Cyber-Physical Systems through Augmented Reality

      Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery doi:10.1145/3419249.3420162
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      The increasing functionalities and close integration of hardware and software of modern cyber-physical systems present users with distinct challenges in applying and, especially, appropriating those systems within their practices. Existing approaches to design for appropriation and the development of sociable technologies that might support users seeking to understand how to make such technologies work in a specific practice, often lack appropriate user interfaces to explain the internal and environment-related behavior of a technology. By taking the example of 3D printing, we examine how augmented reality can be used as a novel human–machine interface to ease the way for hardware-related appropriation support. Within this paper we designed, implemented and evaluated a prototype called PrintARface, that extends a physical 3D printer by incorporating virtual components. Reflections upon the evaluation of our prototype are used to provide insights that foster the development of hardware-related appropriation support by encompassing augmented reality-based human–machine interfaces.

      @inproceedings{jasche_printarface_2020,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{NordiCHI} '20},
      title = {{PrintARface}: {Supporting} the {Exploration} of {Cyber}-{Physical} {Systems} through {Augmented} {Reality}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7579-5},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3419249.3420162},
      doi = {10.1145/3419249.3420162},
      abstract = {The increasing functionalities and close integration of hardware and software of modern cyber-physical systems present users with distinct challenges in applying and, especially, appropriating those systems within their practices. Existing approaches to design for appropriation and the development of sociable technologies that might support users seeking to understand how to make such technologies work in a specific practice, often lack appropriate user interfaces to explain the internal and environment-related behavior of a technology. By taking the example of 3D printing, we examine how augmented reality can be used as a novel human–machine interface to ease the way for hardware-related appropriation support. Within this paper we designed, implemented and evaluated a prototype called PrintARface, that extends a physical 3D printer by incorporating virtual components. Reflections upon the evaluation of our prototype are used to provide insights that foster the development of hardware-related appropriation support by encompassing augmented reality-based human–machine interfaces.},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 11th {Nordic} {Conference} on {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction}: {Shaping} {Experiences}, {Shaping} {Society}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {appropriation, sociable technologies, augmented reality, 3D printing, Human–machine interface, fablab},
      }

    2019


    • Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2019)Appropriating 3D Printers in Augmented Reality

      Proceedings of Mensch und Computer 2019. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 901–903 doi:10.1145/3340764.3345377
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Digital fabrication technologies, such as 3D printers, are receiving more and more attention, not only from professionals but also from hobbyists. However, even though people have easier access to these devices, 3D printers remain a black box for many users. To support the appropriation of 3D printers, this demonstration presents a system which extends a physical printer to include virtual components using augmented reality (AR). With these components, we try to explain how the printer works and allow the user to operate the printer through an AR application. We extend existing software with a custom solution to create a unique user interface and user experience. Our user interface provides a new way of inspecting models in AR before they are printed.

      @inproceedings{jasche_appropriating_2019,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{MuC}'19},
      title = {Appropriating {3D} {Printers} in {Augmented} {Reality}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7198-8},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3340764.3345377},
      doi = {10.1145/3340764.3345377},
      abstract = {Digital fabrication technologies, such as 3D printers, are receiving more and more attention, not only from professionals but also from hobbyists. However, even though people have easier access to these devices, 3D printers remain a black box for many users. To support the appropriation of 3D printers, this demonstration presents a system which extends a physical printer to include virtual components using augmented reality (AR). With these components, we try to explain how the printer works and allow the user to operate the printer through an AR application. We extend existing software with a custom solution to create a unique user interface and user experience. Our user interface provides a new way of inspecting models in AR before they are printed.},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {Mensch} und {Computer} 2019},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = sep,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {Appropriation, Human-Computer-Interaction, Sociable Technologies, 3D Printer, Augmented Reality},
      pages = {901--903},
      }


    • Jasche, F. & Ludwig, T. (2019)Appropriating 3D Printers in Augmented Reality

      Proceedings of Mensch und Computer 2019. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 901–903 doi:10.1145/3340764.3345377
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Digital fabrication technologies, such as 3D printers, are receiving more and more attention, not only from professionals but also from hobbyists. However, even though people have easier access to these devices, 3D printers remain a black box for many users. To support the appropriation of 3D printers, this demonstration presents a system which extends a physical printer to include virtual components using augmented reality (AR). With these components, we try to explain how the printer works and allow the user to operate the printer through an AR application. We extend existing software with a custom solution to create a unique user interface and user experience. Our user interface provides a new way of inspecting models in AR before they are printed.

      @inproceedings{jasche_appropriating_2019-1,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      title = {Appropriating {3D} {Printers} in {Augmented} {Reality}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7198-8},
      url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3340764.3345377 https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3340764.3345377},
      doi = {10.1145/3340764.3345377},
      abstract = {Digital fabrication technologies, such as 3D printers, are receiving more and more attention, not only from professionals but also from hobbyists. However, even though people have easier access to these devices, 3D printers remain a black box for many users. To support the appropriation of 3D printers, this demonstration presents a system which extends a physical printer to include virtual components using augmented reality (AR). With these components, we try to explain how the printer works and allow the user to operate the printer through an AR application. We extend existing software with a custom solution to create a unique user interface and user experience. Our user interface provides a new way of inspecting models in AR before they are printed.},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {Mensch} und {Computer} 2019},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = sep,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {Appropriation, Human-Computer-Interaction, Sociable Technologies, 3D Printer, Augmented Reality, fablab},
      pages = {901--903},
      }


    • Jasche, F., Kirchhübel, J. & Ludwig, T. (2019)Mixed Reality for supporting Remote-Meetings

      IN Wirtschaftsinformatik 2019 Proceedings
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{jasche_mixed_2019,
      title = {Mixed {Reality} for supporting {Remote}-{Meetings}},
      url = {https://aisel.aisnet.org/wi2019/specialtrack03/papers/2},
      journal = {Wirtschaftsinformatik 2019 Proceedings},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Kirchhübel, Jasmin and Ludwig, Thomas},
      month = feb,
      year = {2019},
      }

    2018


    • Jasche, F., Kirchhübel, J., Ludwig, T. & Ogonowski, C. (2018)BeamLite – Mixed Reality zur Unterstützung von Remote-Meetings

      Mensch und Computer 2018 – Workshopband. doi:10.18420/muc2018-ws07-0378
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Zusammenfassung In der heutigen Zeit sind Meetings nicht mehr physisch an einen Ort gebunden. Vor allem in der Wis-sensarbeit ergänzen Telefonate oder Skype-Konferenzen bereits seit langem klassische Face-to-Face-Meetings. Verschiedene Forschungsdiskurse, vor allem der computerunterstützten Gruppenarbeit, unter-suchen bereits seit nun mehr fast drei Jahrzehnten, wie durch den Einsatz von IT verteilte Gruppenarbeit in ihren verschiedensten Ausprägungen unterstützt werden kann. Mit zunehmender Leistungsfähigkeit von Technologien mit Fokus auf Augmented Reality (AR) sowie Virtual Reality (VR) sind neue Mög-lichkeiten hinzugekommen, die ein hohes Potential zur Unterstützung verteilter Meetings bieten. In die-sem Paper stellen wir einen Ansatz vor, der durch die Kombination von AR und VR ein Kommunikati-onssystem mit verschiedenen Kollaborationsmöglichkeiten zur geeigneten Unterstützung verteilter Meetings umsetzt und durch den Einsatz von Consumer-Hardware auch für die Arbeit von zu Hause geeignet ist. Der Mehrwert des Ansatzes liegt vor allem darin, dass auch solche Szenarien fokussiert werden, bei denen sich zwei oder mehr Personen in demselben Raum befinden sowie ein oder mehrere Personen nicht anwesend sind und entfernt zur selben Zeit kooperieren.

      @inproceedings{jasche_beamlite_2018,
      title = {{BeamLite} – {Mixed} {Reality} zur {Unterstützung} von {Remote}-{Meetings}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.18420/muc2018-ws07-0378},
      doi = {10.18420/muc2018-ws07-0378},
      abstract = {Zusammenfassung In der heutigen Zeit sind Meetings nicht mehr physisch an einen Ort gebunden. Vor allem in der Wis-sensarbeit ergänzen Telefonate oder Skype-Konferenzen bereits seit langem klassische Face-to-Face-Meetings. Verschiedene Forschungsdiskurse, vor allem der computerunterstützten Gruppenarbeit, unter-suchen bereits seit nun mehr fast drei Jahrzehnten, wie durch den Einsatz von IT verteilte Gruppenarbeit in ihren verschiedensten Ausprägungen unterstützt werden kann. Mit zunehmender Leistungsfähigkeit von Technologien mit Fokus auf Augmented Reality (AR) sowie Virtual Reality (VR) sind neue Mög-lichkeiten hinzugekommen, die ein hohes Potential zur Unterstützung verteilter Meetings bieten. In die-sem Paper stellen wir einen Ansatz vor, der durch die Kombination von AR und VR ein Kommunikati-onssystem mit verschiedenen Kollaborationsmöglichkeiten zur geeigneten Unterstützung verteilter Meetings umsetzt und durch den Einsatz von Consumer-Hardware auch für die Arbeit von zu Hause geeignet ist. Der Mehrwert des Ansatzes liegt vor allem darin, dass auch solche Szenarien fokussiert werden, bei denen sich zwei oder mehr Personen in demselben Raum befinden sowie ein oder mehrere Personen nicht anwesend sind und entfernt zur selben Zeit kooperieren.},
      booktitle = {Mensch und {Computer} 2018 - {Workshopband}},
      author = {Jasche, Florian and Kirchhübel, Jasmin and Ludwig, Thomas and Ogonowski, Corinna},
      year = {2018},
      }


    • Kirchhübel, J. & Jasche, F. (2018)BeamLite Nutzerzentrierte Konzeption, Implementierung und Evaluierung eines Mixed Reality Kommunikationssystems für Remote-Meetings (Masterarbeit)

      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Studien zeigen, dass die Anzahl der Meetings im beruflichen Alltag zunimmt. Die räumliche Distribuierung von Arbeitern und Partnern erschwert es jedoch zunehmend Face-to-Face- Meetings abzuhalten. Tele- und Videokonferenzsysteme gehören daher zum Alltag vieler Angestellter und gewinnen zunehmend an Wichtigkeit für die Forschung [RN01]. Bei der Betrachtung unterschiedlicher Systeme fällt auf, dass die Vermittlung von Telepräsenz im Fokus steht. Entwickler und Forscher adressieren mit ihren Projekten die Frage „Wie bringe ich den Remote-Teilnehmer in das Meeting?“ Allerdings mangelt es an der Lösung zu der Fragestellung: „Wie kann das Meeting zu dem Remote-Teilnehmer gebracht werden?“ Die Masterarbeit BeamLite bearbeitet diese Fragestellung. Das Ziel besteht in der Entwicklung eines Konzepts für ein innovatives Mixed Reality-Kommunikationssystem, das sich neuer Technologien wie Virtual Reality und Augmented Reality bedient. Das System kann einem entfernten Teilnehmer eines Meetings die Möglichkeit bieten, sich virtuell an demselben Ort wie die lokalen Teilnehmer zu befinden und aktiv an diesem Meeting teilzunehmen. Der entfernte Teilnehmer kann den Meeting-Raum durch ein Virtual Reality-Headset so realitätsnah wie möglich wahrnehmen, sich in diesem bewegen und mit Objekten sowie Personen in der Umgebung interagieren. Zeitgleich werden Position, Sprache sowie Gestik des entfernten Teilnehmers an die Personen im realen Meeting-Raum mittels Augmentierung durch Datenbrillen übertragen.

      @mastersthesis{kirchhubel_beamlite_2018,
      title = {{BeamLite} {Nutzerzentrierte} {Konzeption}, {Implementierung} und {Evaluierung} eines {Mixed} {Reality} {Kommunikationssystems} für {Remote}-{Meetings} ({Masterarbeit})},
      url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/beamlite_jasche_kirchhuebel_om.pdf},
      abstract = {Studien zeigen, dass die Anzahl der Meetings im beruflichen Alltag zunimmt. Die räumliche Distribuierung von Arbeitern und Partnern erschwert es jedoch zunehmend Face-to-Face- Meetings abzuhalten. Tele- und Videokonferenzsysteme gehören daher zum Alltag vieler Angestellter und gewinnen zunehmend an Wichtigkeit für die Forschung [RN01]. Bei der Betrachtung unterschiedlicher Systeme fällt auf, dass die Vermittlung von Telepräsenz im Fokus steht. Entwickler und Forscher adressieren mit ihren Projekten die Frage „Wie bringe ich den Remote-Teilnehmer in das Meeting?“ Allerdings mangelt es an der Lösung zu der Fragestellung: „Wie kann das Meeting zu dem Remote-Teilnehmer gebracht werden?“ Die Masterarbeit BeamLite bearbeitet diese Fragestellung. Das Ziel besteht in der Entwicklung eines Konzepts für ein innovatives Mixed Reality-Kommunikationssystem, das sich neuer Technologien wie Virtual Reality und Augmented Reality bedient. Das System kann einem entfernten Teilnehmer eines Meetings die Möglichkeit bieten, sich virtuell an demselben Ort wie die lokalen Teilnehmer zu befinden und aktiv an diesem Meeting teilzunehmen. Der entfernte Teilnehmer kann den Meeting-Raum durch ein Virtual Reality-Headset so realitätsnah wie möglich wahrnehmen, sich in diesem bewegen und mit Objekten sowie Personen in der Umgebung interagieren. Zeitgleich werden Position, Sprache sowie Gestik des entfernten Teilnehmers an die Personen im realen Meeting-Raum mittels Augmentierung durch Datenbrillen übertragen.},
      school = {Universität Siegen},
      author = {Kirchhübel, Jasmin and Jasche, Florian},
      year = {2018},
      keywords = {Thesis, thesis},
      }