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    Fatemeh Alizadeh, M.Sc.


    Mail:fatemeh.alizadeh(at)uni-siegen.de

    Raum: –

    Telefon: –

    Vita

    Fatemeh Alizadeh ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin und Doktorandin am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik, insbesondere IT-Sicherheit und Verbraucherinformatik an der Universität Siegen. Nach ihrem Bachelor-Abschluss in Informatik setzte sie ihr Studium mit einem ersten Master-Abschluss in Künstlicher Intelligenz und einem zweiten in Mensch-Computer-Interaktion an der Universität Siegen fort, während dessen sie den Usability Challenge Award in Deutschland gewonnen hat. Fatemehs Forschungsinteresse gilt der Entwicklung neuer und kreativer Kommunikationstechniken zwischen Nutzern und undurchsichtigen KI-Algorithmen, um den Nutzern eine befriedigendere und ansprechendere Interaktion zu ermöglichen.

    Publikationen

    2021


    • Pins, D., Jakobi, T., Boden, A., Alizadeh, F. & Wulf, V. (2021)Alexa, We Need to Talk: A Data Literacy Approach on Voice Assistants

      New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 495–507 doi:10.1145/3461778.3462001
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Voice assistants (VA) collect data about users’ daily life including interactions with other connected devices, musical preferences, and unintended interactions. While users appreciate the convenience of VAs, their understanding and expectations of data collection by vendors are often vague and incomplete. By making the collected data explorable for consumers, our research-through-design approach seeks to unveil design resources for fostering data literacy and help users in making better informed decisions regarding their use of VAs. In this paper, we present the design of an interactive prototype that visualizes the conversations with VAs on a timeline and provides end users with basic means to engage with data, for instance allowing for filtering and categorization. Based on an evaluation with eleven households, our paper provides insights on how users reflect upon their data trails and presents design guidelines for supporting data literacy of consumers in the context of VAs.

      @inproceedings{pins_alexa_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{DIS} '21},
      title = {Alexa, {We} {Need} to {Talk}: {A} {Data} {Literacy} {Approach} on {Voice} {Assistants}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-8476-6},
      shorttitle = {Alexa, {We} {Need} to {Talk}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3461778.3462001},
      doi = {10.1145/3461778.3462001},
      abstract = {Voice assistants (VA) collect data about users’ daily life including interactions with other connected devices, musical preferences, and unintended interactions. While users appreciate the convenience of VAs, their understanding and expectations of data collection by vendors are often vague and incomplete. By making the collected data explorable for consumers, our research-through-design approach seeks to unveil design resources for fostering data literacy and help users in making better informed decisions regarding their use of VAs. In this paper, we present the design of an interactive prototype that visualizes the conversations with VAs on a timeline and provides end users with basic means to engage with data, for instance allowing for filtering and categorization. Based on an evaluation with eleven households, our paper provides insights on how users reflect upon their data trails and presents design guidelines for supporting data literacy of consumers in the context of VAs.},
      urldate = {2021-07-05},
      booktitle = {Designing {Interactive} {Systems} {Conference} 2021},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Pins, Dominik and Jakobi, Timo and Boden, Alexander and Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Wulf, Volker},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      pages = {495--507},
      }


    • Alizadeh, F., Stevens, G. & Esau, M. (2021)I Don’t Know, Is AI Also Used in Airbags?

      IN i-com, Vol. 20, Pages: 3–17 doi:doi:10.1515/icom-2021-0009
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{alizadeh_i_2021,
      title = {I {Don}’t {Know}, {Is} {AI} {Also} {Used} in {Airbags}?},
      volume = {20},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1515/icom-2021-0009},
      doi = {doi:10.1515/icom-2021-0009},
      number = {1},
      journal = {i-com},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Stevens, Gunnar and Esau, Margarita},
      year = {2021},
      pages = {3--17},
      }

    2020


    • Alizadeh, F. (2020)“Exploration of Cyber Victimology through Victims’ Narrations to Design for Digital Resilience”

      , Siegen
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @phdthesis{alizadeh_exploration_2020,
      address = {Siegen},
      title = {“{Exploration} of {Cyber} {Victimology} through {Victims}’ {Narrations} to {Design} for {Digital} {Resilience}”},
      url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Masterarbeit-Alizadeh.pdf},
      school = {University of Siegen},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh},
      month = feb,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {thesis},
      }


    • Alizadeh, F., Esau, M., Stevens, G. & Cassens, L. (2020)eXplainable AI: Take one Step Back, Move two Steps forward

      doi:10.18420/muc2020-ws111-369
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In 1991 the researchers at the center for the Learning Sciences of Carnegie Mellon University were confronted with the confusing question of “where is AI” from the users, who were interacting with AI but did not realize it. Three decades of research and we are still facing the same issue with the AItechnology users. In the lack of users’ awareness and mutual understanding of AI-enabled systems between designers and users, informal theories of the users about how a system works (“Folk theories”) become inevitable but can lead to misconceptions and ineffective interactions. To shape appropriate mental models of AI-based systems, explainable AI has been suggested by AI practitioners. However, a profound understanding of the current users’ perception of AI is still missing. In this study, we introduce the term “Perceived AI” as “AI defined from the perspective of its users”. We then present our preliminary results from deep-interviews with 50 AItechnology users, which provide a framework for our future research approach towards a better understanding of PAI and users’ folk theories.

      @article{alizadeh_explainable_2020,
      title = {{eXplainable} {AI}: {Take} one {Step} {Back}, {Move} two {Steps} forward},
      shorttitle = {{eXplainable} {AI}},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/33513},
      doi = {10.18420/muc2020-ws111-369},
      abstract = {In 1991 the researchers at the center for the Learning Sciences of Carnegie Mellon University were confronted with the confusing question of “where is AI” from the users, who were interacting with AI but did not realize it. Three decades of research and we are still facing the same issue with the AItechnology users. In the lack of users’ awareness and mutual understanding of AI-enabled systems between designers and users, informal theories of the users about how a system works (“Folk theories”) become inevitable but can lead to misconceptions and ineffective interactions. To shape appropriate mental models of AI-based systems, explainable AI has been suggested by AI practitioners. However, a profound understanding of the current users’ perception of AI is still missing. In this study, we introduce the term “Perceived AI” as “AI defined from the perspective of its users”. We then present our preliminary results from deep-interviews with 50 AItechnology users, which provide a framework for our future research approach towards a better understanding of PAI and users’ folk theories.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar and Cassens, Lena},
      year = {2020},
      note = {Accepted: 2020-08-18T15:19:49Z
      Publisher: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
      }

    2019


    • Alizadeh, F., Jakobi, T., Boldt, J. & Stevens, G. (2019)GDPR-Reality Check on the Right to Access Data: Claiming and Investigating Personally Identifiable Data from Companies

      New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 811–814 doi:10.1145/3340764.3344913
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Loyalty programs are early examples of companies commercially collecting and processing personal data. Today, more than ever before, personal information is being used by companies of all types for a wide variety of purposes. To limit this, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aims to provide consumers with tools to control data collection and processing. What this right concretely means, which types of tools companies have to provide to their customers and in which way, is currently uncertain because precedents from case law are missing. Contributing to closing this gap, we turn to the example of loyalty cards to supplement current implementations of the right to claim data with a user perspective. In our hands-on approach, we had 13 households request their personal data from their respective loyalty program. We investigate expectations of GDPR in general and the right to access in particular, observe the process of claiming and receiving, and discuss the provided data takeouts. One year after the GDPR has come into force, our findings highlight the consumer’s expectations and knowledge of the GDPR and in particular the right to access to inform design of more usable privacy enhancing technologies.

      @inproceedings{alizadeh_gdpr-reality_2019,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{MuC}'19},
      title = {{GDPR}-{Reality} {Check} on the {Right} to {Access} {Data}: {Claiming} and {Investigating} {Personally} {Identifiable} {Data} from {Companies}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7198-8},
      shorttitle = {{GDPR}-{Reality} {Check} on the {Right} to {Access} {Data}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3340764.3344913},
      doi = {10.1145/3340764.3344913},
      abstract = {Loyalty programs are early examples of companies commercially collecting and processing personal data. Today, more than ever before, personal information is being used by companies of all types for a wide variety of purposes. To limit this, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aims to provide consumers with tools to control data collection and processing. What this right concretely means, which types of tools companies have to provide to their customers and in which way, is currently uncertain because precedents from case law are missing. Contributing to closing this gap, we turn to the example of loyalty cards to supplement current implementations of the right to claim data with a user perspective. In our hands-on approach, we had 13 households request their personal data from their respective loyalty program. We investigate expectations of GDPR in general and the right to access in particular, observe the process of claiming and receiving, and discuss the provided data takeouts. One year after the GDPR has come into force, our findings highlight the consumer's expectations and knowledge of the GDPR and in particular the right to access to inform design of more usable privacy enhancing technologies.},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of {Mensch} und {Computer} 2019},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Jakobi, Timo and Boldt, Jens and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = sep,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {Claim personal data, Data takeout, GDPR, Usable Privacy},
      pages = {811--814},
      }


    • Alizadeh, F., Jakobi, T., Boldt, J. & Stevens, G. (2019)GDPR-Realitycheck on the right to access data

      doi:10.1145/3340764.3344913
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Loyalty programs are early examples of companies commercially collecting and processing personal data. Today, more than ever before, personal information is being used by companies of all types for a wide variety of purposes. To limit this, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aims to provide consumers with tools to control data collection and processing. What this right concretely means, which types of tools companies have to provide to their customers and in which way, is currently uncertain because precedents from case law are missing. Contributing to closing this gap, we turn to the example of loyalty cards to supplement current implementations of the right to claim data with a user perspective. In our hands-on approach, we had 13 households request their personal data from their respective loyalty program. We investigate expectations of GDPR in general and the right to access in particular, observe the process of claiming and receiving, and discuss the provided data takeouts. One year after the GDPR has come into force, our findings highlight the consumer’s expectations and knowledge of the GDPR and in particular the right to access to inform design of more usable privacy enhancing technologies.

      @article{alizadeh_gdpr-realitycheck_2019,
      title = {{GDPR}-{Realitycheck} on the right to access data},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/24564},
      doi = {10.1145/3340764.3344913},
      abstract = {Loyalty programs are early examples of companies
      commercially collecting and processing personal data. Today,
      more than ever before, personal information is being used by
      companies of all types for a wide variety of purposes. To limit
      this, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aims to
      provide consumers with tools to control data collection and
      processing. What this right concretely means, which types of
      tools companies have to provide to their customers and in
      which way, is currently uncertain because precedents from
      case law are missing. Contributing to closing this gap, we turn
      to the example of loyalty cards to supplement current
      implementations of the right to claim data with a user
      perspective. In our hands-on approach, we had 13 households
      request their personal data from their respective loyalty
      program. We investigate expectations of GDPR in general and
      the right to access in particular, observe the process of claiming
      and receiving, and discuss the provided data takeouts. One year
      after the GDPR has come into force, our findings highlight the
      consumer's expectations and knowledge of the GDPR and in
      particular the right to access to inform design of more usable
      privacy enhancing technologies.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Jakobi, Timo and Boldt, Jens and Stevens, Gunnar},
      year = {2019},
      note = {Accepted: 2019-08-22T04:36:27Z
      Publisher: ACM},
      }