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    Gaia Mosconi, M.A.

    gaia_mosconiMail: gaia.mosconi(at)uni-siegen.de

    Raum: US-D 102

    Telefon: +49 (0) 271/ 740 – 5265

    Vita

    Gaia Mosconi hat einen multidisziplinären Hintergrund in Architektur und Stadtplanung (mit Schwerpunkt auf dem sozialen Wohnungsbau, partizipativer Stadtplanung, und Gemeingüterschöpfung), soziologischer Forschung (spezifischer Fokus auf qualitative Forschung, Aktionsforschung, Raumentwicklung) und Informationstechnologie (besonderer Schwerpunkt auf digitale Medien). Sie schloss Ihr Studium an der Universität von Trento im Jahr 2015 mit einer Masterarbeit zum Thema „Digital technologies and urban commons. The case study of Social Street“ ab. Ziel dieses Projektes war, Governance für städtische Gemeinschaften zu erzeugen (Einbeziehung der Bürger, die öffentliche Verwaltung und Sozialdienst). Ausgangspunkt waren Veranstaltungen und Aktivitäten in der Nachbarschaft und der Organisation durch aktive Facebook-Nutzung. Danach absolvierte sie einen Post-Master in „Smart Community design and management“. Derzeit ist Gaia Mosconi Forscherin und Doktorandin an der Universität Siegen in der Gruppe für Computerunterstützte Gruppenarbeit und Soziale Medien (Prof. Dr. Volkmar Pipek). Ganz besonders ist sie an EmerGent beteiligt, ein Projekt, das sich derzeit als aktiver Partner im Krisenmanagement beteiligt (Bürger, soziale Strukturen, Industrieunternehmen). Bei EmerGent wird Gaia ihre Erfahrungen als qualitative Forscherin auf soziale Medien und bürgerschaftliches Engagement übertragen.

    Publikationen

    2019


    • Mosconi, G., Li, Q., Randall, D., Karasti, H., Tolmie, P., Barutzky, J., Korn, M. & Pipek, V. (2019)Three Gaps in Opening Science

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Vol. 28, Pages: 749–789 doi:10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      The Open Science (OS) agenda has potentially massive cultural, organizational and infrastructural consequences. Ambitions for OS-driven policies have proliferated, within which researchers are expected to publish their scientific data. Significant research has been devoted to studying the issues associated with managing Open Research Data. Digital curation, as it is typically known, seeks to assess data management issues to ensure its long-term value and encourage secondary use. Hitherto, relatively little interest has been shown in examining the immense gap that exists between the OS grand vision and researchers’ actual data practices. Our specific contribution is to examine research data practices before systematic attempts at curation are made. We suggest that interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven contexts offer a perspicuous opportunity to understand the Data Curation and Research Data Management issues that can problematize uptake. These relate to obvious discrepancies between Open Research Data policies and subject-specific research practices and needs. Not least, it opens up questions about how data is constituted in different disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts. We present a detailed empirical account of interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven research contexts in order to clarify critical aspects of the OS agenda and how to realize its benefits, highlighting three gaps: between policy and practice, in knowledge, and in tool use and development.

      @article{mosconi_three_2019,
      title = {Three {Gaps} in {Opening} {Science}},
      volume = {28},
      issn = {1573-7551},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-019-09354-z},
      abstract = {The Open Science (OS) agenda has potentially massive cultural, organizational and infrastructural consequences. Ambitions for OS-driven policies have proliferated, within which researchers are expected to publish their scientific data. Significant research has been devoted to studying the issues associated with managing Open Research Data. Digital curation, as it is typically known, seeks to assess data management issues to ensure its long-term value and encourage secondary use. Hitherto, relatively little interest has been shown in examining the immense gap that exists between the OS grand vision and researchers’ actual data practices. Our specific contribution is to examine research data practices before systematic attempts at curation are made. We suggest that interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven contexts offer a perspicuous opportunity to understand the Data Curation and Research Data Management issues that can problematize uptake. These relate to obvious discrepancies between Open Research Data policies and subject-specific research practices and needs. Not least, it opens up questions about how data is constituted in different disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts. We present a detailed empirical account of interdisciplinary ethnographically-driven research contexts in order to clarify critical aspects of the OS agenda and how to realize its benefits, highlighting three gaps: between policy and practice, in knowledge, and in tool use and development.},
      language = {en},
      number = {3},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
      author = {Mosconi, Gaia and Li, Qinyu and Randall, Dave and Karasti, Helena and Tolmie, Peter and Barutzky, Jana and Korn, Matthias and Pipek, Volkmar},
      month = jun,
      year = {2019},
      pages = {749--789},
      }

    2017


    • Mosconi, G., Korn, M., Reuter, C., Tolmie, P., Teli, M. & Pipek, V. (2017)From Facebook to the Neighbourhood: Infrastructuring of Hybrid Community Engagement

      IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Vol. 26, Pages: 959–1003 doi:10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In recent years, social media have increased the resources that individuals and organizations are able to mobilize for the development of socially innovative practices. In this article, we engage with a naturally occurring development in a Trentinian neighbourhood to examine the cooperative interactions amongst members of a local community. The first author and local residents of the neighbourhood participated in online discussions, decision making, and physical activities that led to material changes in the area. The interventions are motivated by and based on the concept of Social Street that combines online interactions in a closed Facebook group with face-to-face meetings seeking to practically engage the collective in accomplishing certain immediate or ongoing needs. Over the course of two years, we studied this local instantiation of Social Street in Trento, Italy by way of an action-oriented (digital) ethnography. Through this work, we demonstrate how urban neighbourhoods might benefit from hybrid forms of community engagement that are enacted through a constant back and forth between online and face-to-face interactions. We further argue that the infrastructuring of local urban collectives should follow strategies that pay attention to the multiple issues in urban neighbourhoods and people’s attachments to them. Overall, the paper reflects upon the challenges and configurations of participation that this form of community-work entails.

      @article{mosconi_facebook_2017,
      title = {From {Facebook} to the {Neighbourhood}: {Infrastructuring} of {Hybrid} {Community} {Engagement}},
      volume = {26},
      url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z},
      doi = {10.1007/s10606-017-9291-z},
      abstract = {In recent years, social media have increased the resources that individuals and organizations are able to mobilize for the development of socially innovative practices. In this article, we engage with a naturally occurring development in a Trentinian neighbourhood to examine the cooperative interactions amongst members of a local community. The first author and local residents of the neighbourhood participated in online discussions, decision making, and physical activities that led to material changes in the area. The interventions are motivated by and based on the concept of Social Street that combines online interactions in a closed Facebook group with face-to-face meetings seeking to practically engage the collective in accomplishing certain immediate or ongoing needs. Over the course of two years, we studied this local instantiation of Social Street in Trento, Italy by way of an action-oriented (digital) ethnography. Through this work, we demonstrate how urban neighbourhoods might benefit from hybrid forms of community engagement that are enacted through a constant back and forth between online and face-to-face interactions. We further argue that the infrastructuring of local urban collectives should follow strategies that pay attention to the multiple issues in urban neighbourhoods and people's attachments to them. Overall, the paper reflects upon the challenges and configurations of participation that this form of community-work entails.},
      number = {4-6},
      journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
      author = {Mosconi, Gaia and Korn, Matthias and Reuter, Christian and Tolmie, Peter and Teli, Maurizio and Pipek, Volkmar},
      year = {2017},
      keywords = {CSCW, HCI, A-Paper, SMO, KOKOS, HyServ},
      pages = {959--1003},
      }