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    Tanja Ertl, M.A.

    Tanja Ertl

    Mail: tanja.ertl(at)uni-siegen.de

    Raum: US-E 113
    Telefon: +49 271 740-2141

    Sprechstunde: Nach Vereinbarung

    Vita

    Tanja Ertl absolvierte ihren B.A. in Soziologie an der Technischen Universität Berlin (2015). Ihren M.A. erlangte sie in Medien und Gesellschaft mit den Schwerpunkten Sozialwissenschaften und Sozio-Informatik an der Universität Siegen (2018). Als Wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft unterstützte sie während ihres Masters im Bereich der Qualitativen Sozialforschung die Projekte come_In (Interkulturelles computergestütztes Lernen), My-AHA (Mein aktives und gesundes Altern) und LionAlert (Mensch-Tier-Konflikt) am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien von Prof. Dr. Volker Wulf. Ethnographische Feldforschung konnte sie währenddessen im Atlasgebirge/Marokko (come_In) sowie Okavango Delta/Botswana (LionAlert) wahrnehmen. Von 2017 bis 2019 übernahm sie zudem die Rolle des Academic Advisor für die Studiengänge der Wirtschaftsinformatik und Human-Computer Interaction mit den Tätigkeitsschwerpunkten: Studierendenberatung, Lehrorganisation und –koordination, Bewerbungsmanagement, Internationalisierung sowie Reakkreditierung (HCI). Von 2018 bis 2020 war Tanja Ertl als Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin und PhD Studentin am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien in der Nachwuchsforschergruppe KontiKat tätig. Seit 2021 unterstützt sie nunmehr Prof. Dr. Claudia Müller im Teilprojekt A05 des SFB 1187 am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik, insb. IT für die Alternde Gesellschaft. Ihre Forschungsschwerpunkte sind HCI4Margins, Community Based Research in sensitive Settings, Digital Participation and Inclusion, e(Mental)Health and Methodological Innovation.

    Publikationen

    2021


    • Kaspar, H., Pelzelmayer, K., Schürch, A., Bäumer, F., Ertl, T., Gashi, S., Müller, C., Sereflioglu, T. & van Holten, K. (2021)Können sorgende Gemeinschaften die häusliche Langzeitversorgung verbessern?

      IN Primary and Hospital Care, Vol. 21, Pages: 188–190 doi:10.4414/phc-d.2021.10401
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{kaspar_konnen_2021,
      title = {Können sorgende {Gemeinschaften} die häusliche {Langzeitversorgung} verbessern?},
      volume = {21},
      copyright = {info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess},
      issn = {2297-7155},
      url = {https://primary-hospital-care.ch/article/doi/phc-d.2021.10401},
      doi = {10.4414/phc-d.2021.10401},
      language = {deu},
      number = {6},
      urldate = {2021-06-22},
      journal = {Primary and Hospital Care},
      author = {Kaspar, Heidi and Pelzelmayer, Katharina and Schürch, Anita and Bäumer, Fabian and Ertl, Tanja and Gashi, Shkumbin and Müller, Claudia and Sereflioglu, Timur and van Holten, Karin},
      collaborator = {Kaspar, Heidi and Pelzelmayer, Katharina and Schürch, Anita and Bäumer, Fabian and Ertl, Tanja and Gashi, Shkumbin and Müller, Claudia and Sereflioglu, Timur and van Holten, Karin},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      note = {Num Pages: 3
      Number: 6
      Publisher: EHM Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag AG, Muttenz},
      pages = {188--190},
      }


    • Grinko, M., Ertl, T., Aal, K. & Wulf, V. (2021)Transitions by Methodology in Human-Wildlife Conflict – Reflections on Tech-based Reorganization of Social Practices

      LIMITS ’21: Workshop on Computing within Limits., Pages: 13
      [BibTeX] [Abstract]

      Can cattle farmers live peacefully alongside lions, and what role can technology play in this sensitive setting? Since 2017, we have been investigating this question in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, using a Grounded Design (GD) approach. Based on community involvement we have been building and evaluating a system together with local and foreign experts which warns the locals when a lion comes near their village or their cattle and which has significantly reduced livestock predation by giving time for action. However, as our research shows, technology alone is not the solution for locals’ problems: education, knowledge transfer, economic self-determination, as well as the revival of herding traditions and lost connection to nature need to evolve further to foster a true coexistence between humans and predators in Botswana – and perhaps all over the world. To address these problems and solutions by design and ensure sustainability of its outcome, it is important to take into account the oral culture and collective history of the inhabitants with predators, especially lions. Consideration must also be given to their social environment and individual experiences and goals, as well as their digital infrastructure, accessibility, and digital ecologies. We therefore argue that the successful development of a design solution requires a holistic understanding of design that is built on inclusion, participation, collaboration, understanding, respect, sacredness and the always-recurrent cyclic renovation of life.

      @inproceedings{grinko_transitions_2021,
      title = {Transitions by {Methodology} in {Human}-{Wildlife} {Conflict} - {Reflections} on {Tech}-based {Reorganization} of {Social} {Practices}},
      abstract = {Can cattle farmers live peacefully alongside lions, and what role can technology play in this sensitive setting? Since 2017, we have been investigating this question in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, using a Grounded Design (GD) approach. Based on community involvement we have been building and evaluating a system together with local and foreign experts which warns the locals when a lion comes near their village or their cattle and which has significantly reduced livestock predation by giving time for action. However, as our research shows, technology alone is not the solution for locals’ problems: education, knowledge transfer, economic self-determination, as well as the revival of herding traditions and lost connection to nature need to evolve further to foster a true coexistence between humans and predators in Botswana - and perhaps all over the world. To address these problems and solutions by design and ensure sustainability of its outcome, it is important to take into account the oral culture and collective history of the inhabitants with predators, especially lions. Consideration must also be given to their social environment and individual experiences and goals, as well as their digital infrastructure, accessibility, and digital ecologies. We therefore argue that the successful development of a design solution requires a holistic understanding of design that is built on inclusion, participation, collaboration, understanding, respect, sacredness and the always-recurrent cyclic renovation of life.},
      language = {en},
      booktitle = {{LIMITS} ’21: {Workshop} on {Computing} within {Limits}},
      author = {Grinko, Margarita and Ertl, Tanja and Aal, Konstantin and Wulf, Volker},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      pages = {13},
      }


    • Ertl, T., Müller, C., Aal, K., Wulf, V., Tachtler, F., Scheepmaker, L., Fitzpatrick, G., Smith, N. & Schuler, D. (2021)Ethical Future Environments: Smart Thinking about Smart Cities means engaging with its Most Vulnerable

      C&T ’21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies – Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 340–345 doi:10.1145/3461564.3468165
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Over the past several decades the concept of smart cities has gained a lot of attention amongst researchers, the media, governments, civic groups and citizens. The literature shows that innovations have a more positive impact when they stimulate the development of cities and shape their space for a variety of participants, or when design is participatory. This ensures a non-technocratic approach, i.e., one that builds on the complexity of today’s socio-technical systems and the consideration of their individual actors. Citizen-based approaches or one of the so-called Caring Community are possible answers to this. In this Design Fiction workshop, we take a critical view on the idea of smart cities by broadening participation to stakeholders who are still excluded from its concept and can be described as vulnerable and often marginalized, such as people who are (culturally) diverse (e.g. migrants, refugees, older adults, children, currently and formerly incarcerated people, homeless people and those with low income) or neurodiverse (e.g. people living with mental health challenges as autism or dementia or who suffer from functional impairments), and also animals and nature who are left behind in the whole digitization process. In this regard we will also address topics like sustainability and well-being. One of the expected outcomes of this workshop is the development of a holistic and sustainable smart city concept involving currently excluded stakeholders.

      @inproceedings{ertl_ethical_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {C\&{T} '21},
      title = {Ethical {Future} {Environments}: {Smart} {Thinking} about {Smart} {Cities} means engaging with its {Most} {Vulnerable}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9056-9},
      shorttitle = {Ethical {Future} {Environments}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3461564.3468165},
      doi = {10.1145/3461564.3468165},
      abstract = {Over the past several decades the concept of smart cities has gained a lot of attention amongst researchers, the media, governments, civic groups and citizens. The literature shows that innovations have a more positive impact when they stimulate the development of cities and shape their space for a variety of participants, or when design is participatory. This ensures a non-technocratic approach, i.e., one that builds on the complexity of today's socio-technical systems and the consideration of their individual actors. Citizen-based approaches or one of the so-called Caring Community are possible answers to this. In this Design Fiction workshop, we take a critical view on the idea of smart cities by broadening participation to stakeholders who are still excluded from its concept and can be described as vulnerable and often marginalized, such as people who are (culturally) diverse (e.g. migrants, refugees, older adults, children, currently and formerly incarcerated people, homeless people and those with low income) or neurodiverse (e.g. people living with mental health challenges as autism or dementia or who suffer from functional impairments), and also animals and nature who are left behind in the whole digitization process. In this regard we will also address topics like sustainability and well-being. One of the expected outcomes of this workshop is the development of a holistic and sustainable smart city concept involving currently excluded stakeholders.},
      urldate = {2021-07-05},
      booktitle = {C\&{T} '21: {Proceedings} of the 10th {International} {Conference} on {Communities} \& {Technologies} - {Wicked} {Problems} in the {Age} of {Tech}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Müller, Claudia and Aal, Konstantin and Wulf, Volker and Tachtler, Franziska and Scheepmaker, Laura and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine and Smith, Nancy and Schuler, Douglas},
      month = jun,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Animal-Computer Interaction, Caring Community, Citizen Science, Marginalization, Smart Cities, Urban Informatics, Vulnerability},
      pages = {340--345},
      }


    • Tachtler, F., Aal, K., Ertl, T., Diethei, D., Niess, J., Khwaja, M., Talhouk, R., Vilaza, G. N., Lazem, S., Singh, A., Barry, M., Wulf, V. & Fitzpatrick, G. (2021)Artificially Intelligent Technology for the Margins: A Multidisciplinary Design Agenda

      Extended Abstracts of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–7 doi:10.1145/3411763.3441333
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      There has been increasing interest in socially just use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) in the development of technology that may be extended to marginalized people. However, the exploration of such technologies entails the development of an understanding of how they may increase and/or counter marginalization. The use of AI/ML algorithms can lead to several challenges, such as privacy and security concerns, biases, unfairness, and lack of cultural awareness, which especially affect marginalized people. This workshop will provide a forum to share experiences and challenges of developing AI/ML health and social wellbeing technologies with/for marginalized people and will work towards developing design methods to engage in the re-envisioning of AI/ML technologies for and with marginalized people. In doing so we will create cross-research area dialogues and collaborations. These discussions build a basis to (1) explore potential tools to support designing AI/ML systems with marginalized people, and (2) develop a design agenda for future research and AI/ML technology for and with marginalized people.

      @inproceedings{tachtler_artificially_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{CHI} {EA} '21},
      title = {Artificially {Intelligent} {Technology} for the {Margins}: {A} {Multidisciplinary} {Design} {Agenda}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-8095-9},
      shorttitle = {Artificially {Intelligent} {Technology} for the {Margins}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3411763.3441333},
      doi = {10.1145/3411763.3441333},
      abstract = {There has been increasing interest in socially just use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) in the development of technology that may be extended to marginalized people. However, the exploration of such technologies entails the development of an understanding of how they may increase and/or counter marginalization. The use of AI/ML algorithms can lead to several challenges, such as privacy and security concerns, biases, unfairness, and lack of cultural awareness, which especially affect marginalized people. This workshop will provide a forum to share experiences and challenges of developing AI/ML health and social wellbeing technologies with/for marginalized people and will work towards developing design methods to engage in the re-envisioning of AI/ML technologies for and with marginalized people. In doing so we will create cross-research area dialogues and collaborations. These discussions build a basis to (1) explore potential tools to support designing AI/ML systems with marginalized people, and (2) develop a design agenda for future research and AI/ML technology for and with marginalized people.},
      urldate = {2021-06-10},
      booktitle = {Extended {Abstracts} of the 2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Tachtler, Franziska and Aal, Konstantin and Ertl, Tanja and Diethei, Daniel and Niess, Jasmin and Khwaja, Mohammed and Talhouk, Reem and Vilaza, Giovanna Nunes and Lazem, Shaimaa and Singh, Aneesha and Barry, Marguerite and Wulf, Volker and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine},
      month = may,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {Privacy, Security, HCI4D, ICT4D, AI, Data, Ethics, Global South, Marginalized people, ML},
      pages = {1--7},
      }

    2020


    • Ertl, T., Aal, K., Diraoui, H., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2020)Psychosocial ICT: The Potential, Challenges and Benefits of Self-help Tools for Refugees with Negative Mental Stress

      doi:10.18420/ecscw2020_ep11
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has penetrated almost all areas of life today and has the potential to create positive change. This paper addresses the opportunities offered by ICT for improving the resilience and psychosocial well-being of refugees who have experienced mentally stressful events when forced to leave their home country and seek shelter in a different host country. We want to distinguish between perceived stress and clinically-defined trauma, for which therapeutic interventions require direct personal contact with psychological experts. However, we also want to focus on the digital possibilities that currently exist to support establishing this kind of personal connection. Many refugees need to seek psychological help, but social, economic and cultural barriers hold them back. Our qualitative study with refugees, psychologists and volunteers provides insights into how refugees deal with their mental issues and the challenges they face in everyday life. We aim to show that ICT can play a major role in terms of addressing awareness and self-empowerment as an entry point for this vulnerable group. We also discuss the potential challenges and benefits of ICT for refugees seeking to recover their mental stability.

      @article{ertl_psychosocial_2020,
      title = {Psychosocial {ICT}: {The} {Potential}, {Challenges} and {Benefits} of {Self}-help {Tools} for {Refugees} with {Negative} {Mental} {Stress}},
      issn = {2510-2591},
      shorttitle = {Psychosocial {ICT}},
      url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3404},
      doi = {10.18420/ecscw2020_ep11},
      abstract = {Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has penetrated almost all areas of life today and has the potential to create positive change. This paper addresses the opportunities offered by ICT for improving the resilience and psychosocial well-being of refugees who have experienced mentally stressful events when forced to leave their home country and seek shelter in a different host country. We want to distinguish between perceived stress and clinically-defined trauma, for which therapeutic interventions require direct personal contact with psychological experts. However, we also want to focus on the digital possibilities that currently exist to support establishing this kind of personal connection. Many refugees need to seek psychological help, but social, economic and cultural barriers hold them back. Our qualitative study with refugees, psychologists and volunteers provides insights into how refugees deal with their mental issues and the challenges they face in everyday life. We aim to show that ICT can play a major role in terms of addressing awareness and self-empowerment as an entry point for this vulnerable group. We also discuss the potential challenges and benefits of ICT for refugees seeking to recover their mental stability.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Aal, Konstantin and Diraoui, Hoda and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2020},
      note = {Accepted: 2020-06-05T23:52:33Z
      Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
      keywords = {italg},
      }

    2019


    • Ertl, T., Taugerbeck, S., Esau, M., Aal, K., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2019)The Social Mile – How (Psychosocial) ICT can Help to Promote Resocialization and to Overcome Prison

      IN Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 3, Pages: 248:1–248:31 doi:10.1145/3370270
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.

      @article{ertl_social_2019,
      title = {The {Social} {Mile} - {How} ({Psychosocial}) {ICT} can {Help} to {Promote} {Resocialization} and to {Overcome} {Prison}},
      volume = {3},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3370270},
      doi = {10.1145/3370270},
      abstract = {There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.},
      number = {GROUP},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Taugerbeck, Sebastian and Esau, Margarita and Aal, Konstantin and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      month = dec,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {cscw, qualitative research, italg, ai-infused, digital participation, prison, prisoners, psychosocial ict, smart mirror, social participation, voice-based technology},
      pages = {248:1--248:31},
      }


    • Ahmadi, M., Weibert, A., Wenzelmann, V., Ertl, T., Randall, D., Tolmie, P., Wulf, V. & Marsden, N. (2019)Gender Factors and Feminist Values in Living Labs

      IN Loh, J. & Coeckelbergh, M. (Eds.), Feminist Philosophy of Technology Stuttgart doi:10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In this paper, we describe the feminist perspectives that have informed design in the HCI community, and develop an argument for an approach that translates these broad commitments into a pragmatic design space, drawing on emancipatory agendas such as participatory design. As designers of technologies, we regard creating research infrastructures that offer safe spaces for the development of user-centered artifacts based on diverse and critical perspectives as not only a utopian vision, but as a practical contribution to a more equal society. Shaowen Bardzell stresses this point when she states that in envisioning utopias, we are “seeking not so much to predict the future, but rather to imagine a radically better one”. Recognizing that technology shapes social life and amplifies social practices both good and bad, research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) increasingly focuses on how technology has been developed in the past, and how constructive futures may be envisaged. More and more, academics are inviting multidisciplinarity and embracing ethnographic methods as part of the design of networks and technical artifacts, realizing that innovation cannot be user-centered if designers employ a bird’s-eye perspective. This leads to an approach that advocates designing socially embedded technologies in real world environments. Thus, for some time now, collaboration and participatory design approaches have provided a means for enacting positive social and technological change. If we agree that “those who design technologies are […] designing society”, new questions arise in terms of responsibility for the future shape of the world: How do we design technologies to design a better society for people of all genders?

      @incollection{ahmadi_gender_2019,
      address = {Stuttgart},
      series = {Techno:{Phil} – {Aktuelle} {Herausforderungen} der {Technikphilosophie}},
      title = {Gender {Factors} and {Feminist} {Values} in {Living} {Labs}},
      isbn = {978-3-476-04967-4},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9},
      abstract = {In this paper, we describe the feminist perspectives that have informed design in the HCI community, and develop an argument for an approach that translates these broad commitments into a pragmatic design space, drawing on emancipatory agendas such as participatory design. As designers of technologies, we regard creating research infrastructures that offer safe spaces for the development of user-centered artifacts based on diverse and critical perspectives as not only a utopian vision, but as a practical contribution to a more equal society. Shaowen Bardzell stresses this point when she states that in envisioning utopias, we are “seeking not so much to predict the future, but rather to imagine a radically better one”. Recognizing that technology shapes social life and amplifies social practices both good and bad, research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) increasingly focuses on how technology has been developed in the past, and how constructive futures may be envisaged. More and more, academics are inviting multidisciplinarity and embracing ethnographic methods as part of the design of networks and technical artifacts, realizing that innovation cannot be user-centered if designers employ a bird’s-eye perspective. This leads to an approach that advocates designing socially embedded technologies in real world environments. Thus, for some time now, collaboration and participatory design approaches have provided a means for enacting positive social and technological change. If we agree that “those who design technologies are […] designing society”, new questions arise in terms of responsibility for the future shape of the world: How do we design technologies to design a better society for people of all genders?},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Feminist {Philosophy} of {Technology}},
      publisher = {J.B. Metzler},
      author = {Ahmadi, Michael and Weibert, Anne and Wenzelmann, Victoria and Ertl, Tanja and Randall, Dave and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker and Marsden, Nicola},
      editor = {Loh, Janina and Coeckelbergh, Mark},
      year = {2019},
      doi = {10.1007/978-3-476-04967-4_9},
      keywords = {italg},
      pages = {167--183},
      }