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    Margarita Esau, M.A.

    Margarita Esau

    Mail: margarita.esau(at)uni-siegen.de

    Raum: US-D 120

    Vita

    Margarita Esau studierte Medientechnik (Bachelor) mit dem Schwerpunkt Mediendesign an der technischen Hochschule Deggendorf. Während und nach ihrem Abschluss arbeitete sie freiberuflich in der Medienproduktion und -gestaltung. 2016 folgte ein Masterstudium in Human Computer Interaction an der Universität Siegen, währenddessen sie als wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft in den Projekten „Smart Live“ und „Ganesha“ tätig war. Seit November 2018 ist sie wissenschaftliche Mitarbeitern am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik insbesondere IT-Sicherheit und Verbraucherinformatik. Ihre Forschungsinteressen liegen in den Bereichen Food Consumption, Voice Interaction sowie User Experience Design.

    Publikationen

    2021


    • Lawo, D., Neifer, T., Esau, M., Vonholdt, S. & Stevens, G. (2021)WITHDRAWN: From Farms to Fridges: A Consumer-Oriented Design Approach to Sustainable Food Traceability

      IN Sustainable Production and Consumption, Vol. 27, Pages: 282–297 doi:10.1016/j.spc.2020.11.007
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.

      @article{lawo_withdrawn_2021,
      title = {{WITHDRAWN}: {From} {Farms} to {Fridges}: {A} {Consumer}-{Oriented} {Design} {Approach} to {Sustainable} {Food} {Traceability}},
      volume = {27},
      issn = {2352-5509},
      shorttitle = {{WITHDRAWN}},
      url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352550920313816},
      doi = {10.1016/j.spc.2020.11.007},
      abstract = {This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Sustainable Production and Consumption},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Neifer, Thomas and Esau, Margarita and Vonholdt, Stephanie and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = jul,
      year = {2021},
      pages = {282--297},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Neifer, T., Esau, M., Engelbutzeder, P. & Stevens, G. (2021)Scan&Go: Understanding Adoption and Design of Smartphone-based Self-checkout

      , Publisher: SCITEPRESS – Science and Technology Publications, Pages: 183–194
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Since stationary self-checkout is widely introduced and well understood, previous research barely examined newer generations of smartphone-based Scan&Go. Especially from a design perspective, we know little about the factors contributing to the adoption of Scan&Go solutions and how design enables consumers to take full advantage of this development rather than being burdened with using complex and unenjoyable systems. To understand the influencing factors and the design from a consumer perspective, we conducted a mixed-methods study where we triangulated data of an online survey with 103 participants and a qualitative study with 20 participants. Based on the results, our study presents a refined and nuanced understanding of technology as well as infrastructure-related factors that influence adoption. Moreover, we present several implications for designing and implementing of Scan&Go in retail environments.

      @inproceedings{lawo_scango_2021,
      title = {Scan\&{Go}: {Understanding} {Adoption} and {Design} of {Smartphone}-based {Self}-checkout},
      isbn = {978-989-758-527-2},
      shorttitle = {Scan\&{Go}},
      url = {https://pub.h-brs.de/frontdoor/index/index/docId/5768},
      abstract = {Since stationary self-checkout is widely introduced and well understood, previous research barely examined newer generations of smartphone-based Scan\&Go. Especially from a design perspective, we know little about the factors contributing to the adoption of Scan\&Go solutions and how design enables consumers to take full advantage of this development rather than being burdened with using complex and unenjoyable systems. To understand the influencing factors and the design from a consumer perspective, we conducted a mixed-methods study where we triangulated data of an online survey with 103 participants and a qualitative study with 20 participants. Based on the results, our study presents a refined and nuanced understanding of technology as well as infrastructure-related factors that influence adoption. Moreover, we present several implications for designing and implementing of Scan\&Go in retail environments.},
      language = {eng},
      urldate = {2021-08-02},
      publisher = {SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Neifer, Thomas and Esau, Margarita and Engelbutzeder, Philip and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = jul,
      year = {2021},
      pages = {183--194},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Neifer, T., Esau, M. & Stevens, G. (2021)Buying the ‚Right‘ Thing: Designing Food Recommender Systems with Critical Consumers

      Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–13 doi:10.1145/3411764.3445264
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Critical consumerism is complex as ethical values are difficult to negotiate, appropriate products are hard to find, and product information is overwhelming. Although recommender systems offer solutions to reduce such complexity, current designs are not appropriate for niche practices and use non-personalized intransparent ethics. To support critical consumption, we conducted a design case study on a personalized food recommender system. Therefore, we first conducted an empirical pre-study with 24 consumers to understand value negotiations and current practices, co-designed the recommender system, and finally evaluated it in a real-world trial with ten consumers. Our findings show how recommender systems can support the negotiation of ethical values within the context of consumption practices, reduce the complexity of finding products and stores, and strengthen consumers. In addition to providing implications for the design to support critical consumption practices, we critically reflect on the scope of such recommender systems and its appropriation.

      @inproceedings{lawo_buying_2021,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{CHI} '21},
      title = {Buying the '{Right}' {Thing}: {Designing} {Food} {Recommender} {Systems} with {Critical} {Consumers}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-8096-6},
      shorttitle = {Buying the '{Right}' {Thing}},
      url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411764.3445264},
      doi = {10.1145/3411764.3445264},
      abstract = {Critical consumerism is complex as ethical values are difficult to negotiate, appropriate products are hard to find, and product information is overwhelming. Although recommender systems offer solutions to reduce such complexity, current designs are not appropriate for niche practices and use non-personalized intransparent ethics. To support critical consumption, we conducted a design case study on a personalized food recommender system. Therefore, we first conducted an empirical pre-study with 24 consumers to understand value negotiations and current practices, co-designed the recommender system, and finally evaluated it in a real-world trial with ten consumers. Our findings show how recommender systems can support the negotiation of ethical values within the context of consumption practices, reduce the complexity of finding products and stores, and strengthen consumers. In addition to providing implications for the design to support critical consumption practices, we critically reflect on the scope of such recommender systems and its appropriation.},
      urldate = {2021-05-17},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Neifer, Thomas and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = may,
      year = {2021},
      keywords = {ethics, consumer informatics, co-design, critical consumerism, food, recommender systems},
      pages = {1--13},
      }


    • Alizadeh, F., Stevens, G. & Esau, M. (2021)I Don’t Know, Is AI Also Used in Airbags?

      IN i-com, Vol. 20, Pages: 3–17 doi:doi:10.1515/icom-2021-0009
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @article{alizadeh_i_2021,
      title = {I {Don}’t {Know}, {Is} {AI} {Also} {Used} in {Airbags}?},
      volume = {20},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1515/icom-2021-0009},
      doi = {doi:10.1515/icom-2021-0009},
      number = {1},
      journal = {i-com},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Stevens, Gunnar and Esau, Margarita},
      year = {2021},
      pages = {3--17},
      }

    2020


    • Esau, M., Lawo, D. & Gunnar, S. (2020)Really Smart Fridges: Investigating Sustainable Household Storage Practices

      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      For a long time now, the ’smart fridge‘ is promised to improve everyday life in private households, supporting healthy eating habits and sustainable food practices. However, current technology is still not widespread and limited in its functions. Similarly, researched prototypes are rather persuasive and not aligned with consumers‘ storage practices. We took a practice theoretical lens to investigate current storage practices and actual refrigerators. As follows we present our work in progress and first insights from our contextual inquiry.

      @inproceedings{esau_really_2020,
      title = {Really {Smart} {Fridges}: {Investigating} {Sustainable} {Household} {Storage} {Practices}},
      url = {https://www.verbraucherinformatik.de/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/SmartFridges_ICT4S.pdf},
      abstract = {For a long time now, the 'smart fridge' is promised
      to improve everyday life in private households, supporting
      healthy eating habits and sustainable food practices. However,
      current technology is still not widespread and limited in its functions. Similarly, researched prototypes are rather persuasive and
      not aligned with consumers' storage practices. We took a practice
      theoretical lens to investigate current storage practices and actual
      refrigerators. As follows we present our work in progress and
      first insights from our contextual inquiry.},
      author = {Esau, Margarita and Lawo, Dennis and Gunnar, Stevens},
      month = jun,
      year = {2020},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Esau, M., Engelbutzeder, P. & Stevens, G. (2020)Going Vegan: The Role(s) of ICT in Vegan Practice Transformation

      IN Sustainability, Vol. 12, Pages: 5184 doi:10.3390/su12125184
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      With the debate on climate change, topics of diet change and the reduction of animal products have become increasingly important in both public and academic discourses. However, sustainable ICT studies have so far focused on individual aspects, in particular investigating the criticized persuasive design approach. We argue for a broader perspective on the role(s) of ICT, one that helps in identifying opportunities to support consumer practice transformation, beyond motivational aspects. Based on retrospective interviews with 16 vegans, we argue to understand practice transformation as co-evolution of practices and ICT artefacts, as this perspective helps to understand how tensions arising from complex entanglements of practices, socio-material contexts, and communities can be resolved. Rather than a motivational process, we observe various roles of ICT artefacts co-evolving with practices: Ranging from initial irritation, to access to information about vegan practices, to the learning of vegan food literacy, to the negotiation of a vegan identity, and vegan norms at the intersection of the ‘odd’ and the ‘norm’.

      @article{lawo_going_2020,
      title = {Going {Vegan}: {The} {Role}(s) of {ICT} in {Vegan} {Practice} {Transformation}},
      volume = {12},
      copyright = {http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/},
      shorttitle = {Going {Vegan}},
      url = {https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/12/5184},
      doi = {10.3390/su12125184},
      abstract = {With the debate on climate change, topics of diet change and the reduction of animal products have become increasingly important in both public and academic discourses. However, sustainable ICT studies have so far focused on individual aspects, in particular investigating the criticized persuasive design approach. We argue for a broader perspective on the role(s) of ICT, one that helps in identifying opportunities to support consumer practice transformation, beyond motivational aspects. Based on retrospective interviews with 16 vegans, we argue to understand practice transformation as co-evolution of practices and ICT artefacts, as this perspective helps to understand how tensions arising from complex entanglements of practices, socio-material contexts, and communities can be resolved. Rather than a motivational process, we observe various roles of ICT artefacts co-evolving with practices: Ranging from initial irritation, to access to information about vegan practices, to the learning of vegan food literacy, to the negotiation of a vegan identity, and vegan norms at the intersection of the \‘odd\’ and the \‘norm\’.},
      language = {en},
      number = {12},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Sustainability},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Esau, Margarita and Engelbutzeder, Philip and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = jan,
      year = {2020},
      note = {Number: 12
      Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute},
      keywords = {sustainability, design, ICT, co-evolution, consumer informatics, practice theory, vegan},
      pages = {5184},
      }


    • Alizadeh, F., Esau, M., Stevens, G. & Cassens, L. (2020)eXplainable AI: Take one Step Back, Move two Steps forward

      doi:10.18420/muc2020-ws111-369
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In 1991 the researchers at the center for the Learning Sciences of Carnegie Mellon University were confronted with the confusing question of “where is AI” from the users, who were interacting with AI but did not realize it. Three decades of research and we are still facing the same issue with the AItechnology users. In the lack of users’ awareness and mutual understanding of AI-enabled systems between designers and users, informal theories of the users about how a system works (“Folk theories”) become inevitable but can lead to misconceptions and ineffective interactions. To shape appropriate mental models of AI-based systems, explainable AI has been suggested by AI practitioners. However, a profound understanding of the current users’ perception of AI is still missing. In this study, we introduce the term “Perceived AI” as “AI defined from the perspective of its users”. We then present our preliminary results from deep-interviews with 50 AItechnology users, which provide a framework for our future research approach towards a better understanding of PAI and users’ folk theories.

      @article{alizadeh_explainable_2020,
      title = {{eXplainable} {AI}: {Take} one {Step} {Back}, {Move} two {Steps} forward},
      shorttitle = {{eXplainable} {AI}},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/33513},
      doi = {10.18420/muc2020-ws111-369},
      abstract = {In 1991 the researchers at the center for the Learning Sciences of Carnegie Mellon University were confronted with the confusing question of “where is AI” from the users, who were interacting with AI but did not realize it. Three decades of research and we are still facing the same issue with the AItechnology users. In the lack of users’ awareness and mutual understanding of AI-enabled systems between designers and users, informal theories of the users about how a system works (“Folk theories”) become inevitable but can lead to misconceptions and ineffective interactions. To shape appropriate mental models of AI-based systems, explainable AI has been suggested by AI practitioners. However, a profound understanding of the current users’ perception of AI is still missing. In this study, we introduce the term “Perceived AI” as “AI defined from the perspective of its users”. We then present our preliminary results from deep-interviews with 50 AItechnology users, which provide a framework for our future research approach towards a better understanding of PAI and users’ folk theories.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      author = {Alizadeh, Fatemeh and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar and Cassens, Lena},
      year = {2020},
      note = {Accepted: 2020-08-18T15:19:49Z
      Publisher: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Engelbutzeder, P., Esau, M. & Stevens, G. (2020)Networks of Practices: Exploring Design Opportunities for Interconnected Practices

      doi:10.18420/ecscw2020_ep03
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      For over a decade, researchers from the practice-centered computing community are taking social practices as a unit of design. While the first generation focused on a social practice in isolation, more recent work argues for the (inter-)connections of mutually influencing practices as the primary unit of design. We discuss these current approaches to motivate the notion of a network of practices. Utilizing the case of food practices, we construct and analyze a network populated by the answers of 60 participants. Based on this network we suggest how to identify central elements and clusters as well as points for intervention within the overall network, but also within and in-between clusters of practices. Based on this, our work critically discusses how an understanding of practices as a network could improve practice-based research and design.

      @article{lawo_networks_2020,
      title = {Networks of {Practices}: {Exploring} {Design} {Opportunities} for {Interconnected} {Practices}},
      issn = {2510-2591},
      shorttitle = {Networks of {Practices}},
      url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3408},
      doi = {10.18420/ecscw2020_ep03},
      abstract = {For over a decade, researchers from the practice-centered computing community are taking social practices as a unit of design. While the first generation focused on a social practice in isolation, more recent work argues for the (inter-)connections of mutually influencing practices as the primary unit of design. We discuss these current approaches to motivate the notion of a network of practices. Utilizing the case of food practices, we construct and analyze a network populated by the answers of 60 participants. Based on this network we suggest how to identify central elements and clusters as well as points for intervention within the overall network, but also within and in-between clusters of practices. Based on this, our work critically discusses how an understanding of practices as a network could improve practice-based research and design.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Engelbutzeder, Philip and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar},
      year = {2020},
      note = {Accepted: 2020-06-05T23:52:34Z
      Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
      }

    2019


    • Ertl, T., Taugerbeck, S., Esau, M., Aal, K., Tolmie, P. & Wulf, V. (2019)The Social Mile – How (Psychosocial) ICT can Help to Promote Resocialization and to Overcome Prison

      IN Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 3, Pages: 248:1–248:31 doi:10.1145/3370270
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.

      @article{ertl_social_2019,
      title = {The {Social} {Mile} - {How} ({Psychosocial}) {ICT} can {Help} to {Promote} {Resocialization} and to {Overcome} {Prison}},
      volume = {3},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3370270},
      doi = {10.1145/3370270},
      abstract = {There is currently uncertainty in the research community as to how ICT can and should be designed in such a way that it can be convincingly integrated into the everyday lives of prison inmates. In this paper, we discuss a design fiction that closes this research gap. The descriptions and results of the study are purely fictitious. Excluded is the State of the Art as well as the description of the legal situation of prisons in Germany. The analysis of the fictional study data designed here thus refers to the real world in order to derive ethical guidelines and draw practical conclusions. It is our intention to use these results as a possible basis for further research. The paper presents results of an explorative study dealing with the design, development and evaluation of an AI-based Smart Mirror System, Prison AI 2.0, in a German prison. Prison AI 2.0 was developed for daily use and voluntarily tested by eight prisoners over a period of 12 months to gain insight into their individual and social impact, with an emphasis on its ability to actively support rehabilitation. Based on qualitative data, our findings suggest that intelligent AI-based devices can actually help promote such an outcome. Our results also confirm the valuable impact of (Psychosocial) ICT on the psychological, social and individual aspects of prison life, and in particular how prisoners used the Smart Mirror system to improve and maintain their cognitive, mental and physical state and to restore social interactions with the outside world. With the presentation of these results we want to initiate discussions about the use of ICT by prisoners in closed prisons in order to identify opportunities and risks.},
      number = {GROUP},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction},
      author = {Ertl, Tanja and Taugerbeck, Sebastian and Esau, Margarita and Aal, Konstantin and Tolmie, Peter and Wulf, Volker},
      month = dec,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {cscw, qualitative research, italg, ai-infused, digital participation, prison, prisoners, psychosocial ict, smart mirror, social participation, voice-based technology},
      pages = {248:1--248:31},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Engelbutzeder, P., Esau, M. & Stevens, G. (2019)Towards a Network of Practices: Identifying Central Elements to Inform Design

      Proceedings of the Halfway to the Future Symposium 2019. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–4 doi:10.1145/3363384.3363470
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      For over a decade researchers from the HCI community are taking social practices as a unit of design. While the first generation focused on social practice in isolation, more recent work argues for the interrelatedness of mutually influencing practices as the primary unit of analysis. We discuss these current approaches to motivate the notion of a network of practices. We argue that network theory presents a promising method to create more detailed and sophisticated models of social practices, that raise awareness about central elements and their connecting characteristics. Further on, our work identifies open questions that should be addressed in future work, to increase the benefits of the method.

      @inproceedings{lawo_towards_2019,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{HTTF} 2019},
      title = {Towards a {Network} of {Practices}: {Identifying} {Central} {Elements} to {Inform} {Design}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-7203-9},
      shorttitle = {Towards a {Network} of {Practices}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3363384.3363470},
      doi = {10.1145/3363384.3363470},
      abstract = {For over a decade researchers from the HCI community are taking social practices as a unit of design. While the first generation focused on social practice in isolation, more recent work argues for the interrelatedness of mutually influencing practices as the primary unit of analysis. We discuss these current approaches to motivate the notion of a network of practices. We argue that network theory presents a promising method to create more detailed and sophisticated models of social practices, that raise awareness about central elements and their connecting characteristics. Further on, our work identifies open questions that should be addressed in future work, to increase the benefits of the method.},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the {Halfway} to the {Future} {Symposium} 2019},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Engelbutzeder, Philip and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar},
      month = nov,
      year = {2019},
      keywords = {Consumption, Food Lifecycle, Network of Practices, Practice Theory, Third Wave of HCI},
      pages = {1--4},
      }


    • Lawo, D., Esau, M. & Stevens, G. Same, but Different Data – Towards Integrated Food & Household Services

      , Pages: 5
      [BibTeX] [Abstract]

      While information about our food consumption behavior becomes more and more available through different digitalization trends within this domain, such as food related apps or smart kitchen devices, information remains captured in silos and can therefore not be used for usable and meaningful customer applications. This research in progress presents the approach of integrated food & household services, that are based on best practices of the integrated information systems domain and yet existing integrated fitness & health services, such as GoogleFit or Apple HealthKit.

      @article{lawo_same_nodate,
      title = {Same, but {Different} {Data} - {Towards} {Integrated} {Food} \& {Household} {Services}},
      abstract = {While information about our food consumption behavior becomes more and more available through different digitalization trends within this domain, such as food related apps or smart kitchen devices, information remains captured in silos and can therefore not be used for usable and meaningful customer applications. This research in progress presents the approach of integrated food \& household services, that are based on best practices of the integrated information systems domain and yet existing integrated fitness \& health services, such as GoogleFit or Apple HealthKit.},
      language = {en},
      author = {Lawo, Dennis and Esau, Margarita and Stevens, Gunnar},
      pages = {5},
      }