..
  • Neueste Beiträge

  • Intern

  • Archiv

  • Meta

  • / cscw / home /
     

    Felix Carros M.Sc.

    felix_carros

    Mail: Felix.Carros(at)uni-siegen.de

    Raum: US-E 115

    Sprechstunde: Nach Vereinbarung

    Vita

    Felix Carros studierte an der Universität Siegen und hat dort mit einem Master of Science in Entrepreneurship und SME abgeschlossen. In seiner Abschlussarbeit beschäftigte er sich mit der Exploration von Gesundheitsplattformen im Kontext der alternden Gesellschaft. Während des Studiums arbeitete er für IBM. In Rahmen dieser Tätigkeit fokussierte er sich in erster Linie auf die Versicherungsbranche und die branchenspezifischen Start-Ups, InsurTechs. Seit Februar 2018 ist er am Institut für Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter beschäftigt. Dort liegt sein Forschungsinteresse in der Anwendung der sozial-interaktiven Robotik. Es wird dabei untersucht, wie diese im Kontext von Banking, Religion und Pflege eingesetzt werden kann. Des Weiteren begleitet er andere Forschungsprojekte im Bereich der Robotik und berät zur Nutzereinbindung in die Entwicklung von robotischen Systemen.

    Projekte

    • ARiA
    • GINA
    • PADERO

    verfügbare Paper

    Publikationen

    2022


    • Krüger, M., Carros, F., Ahmadi, M., de Leal, D. C., Brandt, M. & Wulf, V. (2022)Understanding Forestry Practices to Support Climate Adaption

      Adjunct Proceedings of the 2022 Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–6 doi:10.1145/3547522.3547677
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Forests and their management practices are under considerable pressure to adapt to a changing climate. This study reports on early results on the adaptation of forests and forestry practices in Europe. Our study confirms the social and situated nature of forestry and climate adaption and found that the absence of appropriate knowledge and the multi-actor nature of the forest are central challenges for the necessary adaptation. These challenges are well known to HCI research and resonate with approaches to knowledge management and participation of multiple actors in design. The forest however also challenges existing approaches in return. This makes the forest a site not just for urgent action to realise its role in climate mitigation, but also for the production of HCI knowledge.

      @inproceedings{kruger_understanding_2022,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{NordiCHI} '22},
      title = {Understanding {Forestry} {Practices} to {Support} {Climate} {Adaption}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9448-2},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3547522.3547677},
      doi = {10.1145/3547522.3547677},
      abstract = {Forests and their management practices are under considerable pressure to adapt to a changing climate. This study reports on early results on the adaptation of forests and forestry practices in Europe. Our study confirms the social and situated nature of forestry and climate adaption and found that the absence of appropriate knowledge and the multi-actor nature of the forest are central challenges for the necessary adaptation. These challenges are well known to HCI research and resonate with approaches to knowledge management and participation of multiple actors in design. The forest however also challenges existing approaches in return. This makes the forest a site not just for urgent action to realise its role in climate mitigation, but also for the production of HCI knowledge.},
      urldate = {2022-10-04},
      booktitle = {Adjunct {Proceedings} of the 2022 {Nordic} {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction} {Conference}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Krüger, Max and Carros, Felix and Ahmadi, Michael and Leal, Debora de Castro and Brandt, Maximilian and Wulf, Volker},
      month = oct,
      year = {2022},
      keywords = {sustainability, climate, conservation, environmental stewardship, forestry, forests},
      pages = {1--6},
      }


    • Helm, M., Carros, F., Schädler, J. & Wulf, V. (2022)Zoomorphic Robots and People with Disabilities

      Pfleging, B., Gerling, K. & Mayer, S. (Hrsg.), Mensch und Computer 2022 – Tagungsband. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 5 doi:10.1145/3543758.3547552
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Although zoomorphic robots are already popular as companions in some parts of the world, like Japan, they are still a niche product in Germany and are primarily present in academia. In this study, we analyse the effects of the new version of the zoomorphic robot AIBO on people with disabilities living in residential care homes. We observed the interaction for four weeks, giving the care workers and residents complete control of the robot. We specifically looked at factors like well-being and interaction strategies. Our findings show mixed results. Whereas AIBO seems to have positive effects on some residents, e.g. reducing loneliness and enhancing personal well-being, others relate less positively to its limited functions and language restrictions. This study indicates that AIBO has the potential to be used meaningfully in real-world care contexts in Germany but needs improvement to have a fully positive impact.

      @inproceedings{helm_zoomorphic_2022,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      title = {Zoomorphic {Robots} and {People} with {Disabilities}},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/39247},
      doi = {10.1145/3543758.3547552},
      abstract = {Although zoomorphic robots are already popular as companions in some parts of the world, like Japan, they are still a niche product in Germany and are primarily present in academia. In this study, we analyse the effects of the new version of the zoomorphic robot AIBO on people with disabilities living in residential care homes. We observed the interaction for four weeks, giving the care workers and residents complete control of the robot. We specifically looked at factors like well-being and interaction strategies. Our findings show mixed results. Whereas AIBO seems to have positive effects on some residents, e.g. reducing loneliness and enhancing personal well-being, others relate less positively to its limited functions and language restrictions. This study indicates that AIBO has the potential to be used meaningfully in real-world care contexts in Germany but needs improvement to have a fully positive impact.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2022-09-12},
      booktitle = {Pfleging, {B}., {Gerling}, {K}. \& {Mayer}, {S}. ({Hrsg}.), {Mensch} und {Computer} 2022 - {Tagungsband}},
      publisher = {ACM},
      author = {Helm, Melina and Carros, Felix and Schädler, Johannes and Wulf, Volker},
      month = sep,
      year = {2022},
      note = {Accepted: 2022-08-31T09:43:01Z
      Publisher: ACM},
      pages = {5},
      }


    • Carros, F., Störzinger, T., Wierling, A., Preussner, A. & Tolmie, P. (2022)Ethical, Legal & Participatory Concerns in the Development of Human-Robot Interaction: Lessons from Eight Research Projects with Social Robots in Real-World Scenarios

      IN i-com, Vol. 21, Pages: 299–309 doi:10.1515/icom-2022-0025
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Research on Human-Robot Interaction is increasing as system become widely available and reached a level that enables smooth interactions. Yet, many research projects act in a silo mentality, in regard of participatory, ethical, or legal matters of social robotics. Knowledge about specific challenges is not universal and has often to be transferred from non-robotic contexts. We present findings in the three dimensions: participatory design, ethics for social robots and legal aspects. We accompanied eight research projects on social robots in real-world scenarios for three years. During that time, we spoke, observed, and helped (where possible) the research projects. This gave us specific insights into their work. Our findings work in three dimensions. In participatory design we observed that the trust relationship to users is essential to gain truthful insights and that a mixed method approach is promising. Regarding ethical aspects, we could see that ethical matters should be answered early on. And in the legal dimensions we noticed that the GDPR regulations are a challenge that often requires the help of experts. This work is reflecting on the observation of eight projects and is collecting lessons learned to help future projects and to learn from previous work.

      @article{carros_ethical_2022,
      title = {Ethical, {Legal} \& {Participatory} {Concerns} in the {Development} of {Human}-{Robot} {Interaction}: {Lessons} from {Eight} {Research} {Projects} with {Social} {Robots} in {Real}-{World} {Scenarios}},
      volume = {21},
      issn = {2196-6826},
      shorttitle = {Ethical, {Legal} \& {Participatory} {Concerns} in the {Development} of {Human}-{Robot} {Interaction}},
      url = {https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/icom-2022-0025/html},
      doi = {10.1515/icom-2022-0025},
      abstract = {Research on Human-Robot Interaction is increasing as system become widely available and reached a level that enables smooth interactions. Yet, many research projects act in a silo mentality, in regard of participatory, ethical, or legal matters of social robotics. Knowledge about specific challenges is not universal and has often to be transferred from non-robotic contexts. We present findings in the three dimensions: participatory design, ethics for social robots and legal aspects. We accompanied eight research projects on social robots in real-world scenarios for three years. During that time, we spoke, observed, and helped (where possible) the research projects. This gave us specific insights into their work. Our findings work in three dimensions. In participatory design we observed that the trust relationship to users is essential to gain truthful insights and that a mixed method approach is promising. Regarding ethical aspects, we could see that ethical matters should be answered early on. And in the legal dimensions we noticed that the GDPR regulations are a challenge that often requires the help of experts. This work is reflecting on the observation of eight projects and is collecting lessons learned to help future projects and to learn from previous work.},
      language = {en},
      number = {2},
      urldate = {2022-07-19},
      journal = {i-com},
      author = {Carros, Felix and Störzinger, Tobias and Wierling, Anne and Preussner, Adrian and Tolmie, Peter},
      month = aug,
      year = {2022},
      note = {Publisher: Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag},
      keywords = {Participatory Design, Living Lab, long-term, User-Centered Design, GDPR, HRI, Social Robot, Assistive Robots, Ethic, Human-Robot Interaction, Legal, MEESTAR, Meta Research, Qualitative Methods, Quantitative Methods, Research Project, Wizard-of-Oz, Zoomorphic Robots},
      pages = {299--309},
      }


    • Schwaninger, I., Carros, F., Weiss, A., Wulf, V. & Fitzpatrick, G. (2022)Video connecting families and social robots: from ideas to practices putting technology to work

      IN Universal Access in the Information Society doi:10.1007/s10209-022-00901-y
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Technology use is a socially embedded process, especially when it comes to older adults and care. However, the restrictions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have limited social contact to protect vulnerable groups in care homes, and even if technology use has increased in other areas, there is little known about the potential uptake of communication technology and changes in social interaction in the care context during a lasting crisis. This paper explores changes in communication technology use triggered by the pandemic at two care homes, using a qualitative diary study, online interviews and observations, and in-situ interviews within the care home with residents and workers. Our findings point to increasing use of tablets and video conference software triggered by COVID-related experiences, with implications for living and working in care homes. We also characterise the isolation experience of the residents, the workers’ concerns about the residents and changes in social interaction. We observed new areas of technology usage, associated changing work practices, technical affinity issues and context-specific attitudes towards future technologies. While the pandemic has triggered the use of communication technology in care homes on a small scale, this has also caused increasing workload and in particular articulation work, which requires support structures and the re-definition of work roles.

      @article{schwaninger_video_2022,
      title = {Video connecting families and social robots: from ideas to practices putting technology to work},
      issn = {1615-5297},
      shorttitle = {Video connecting families and social robots},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10209-022-00901-y},
      doi = {10.1007/s10209-022-00901-y},
      abstract = {Technology use is a socially embedded process, especially when it comes to older adults and care. However, the restrictions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have limited social contact to protect vulnerable groups in care homes, and even if technology use has increased in other areas, there is little known about the potential uptake of communication technology and changes in social interaction in the care context during a lasting crisis. This paper explores changes in communication technology use triggered by the pandemic at two care homes, using a qualitative diary study, online interviews and observations, and in-situ interviews within the care home with residents and workers. Our findings point to increasing use of tablets and video conference software triggered by COVID-related experiences, with implications for living and working in care homes. We also characterise the isolation experience of the residents, the workers’ concerns about the residents and changes in social interaction. We observed new areas of technology usage, associated changing work practices, technical affinity issues and context-specific attitudes towards future technologies. While the pandemic has triggered the use of communication technology in care homes on a small scale, this has also caused increasing workload and in particular articulation work, which requires support structures and the re-definition of work roles.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2022-08-08},
      journal = {Universal Access in the Information Society},
      author = {Schwaninger, Isabel and Carros, Felix and Weiss, Astrid and Wulf, Volker and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine},
      month = jul,
      year = {2022},
      keywords = {Values, a-paper, Care work, Communication technology, Configuration work, COVID-19 pandemic, Diary study, Digital literacy, Robots, Work roles},
      }


    • Chang, Y., Carros, F., Manavi, M. & Rathmann, M. (2022)How do Roboticists Imagine a Robotised Future? A Case Study on a Japanese HRI Research Project

      doi:10.20944/preprints202204.0081.v1
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      This study observes, interprets, and analyses the knowledge production in the research field of Human–Robot Interaction (HRI). It intends to foreground the hidden assumptions that are often taken for granted when roboticist design and conduct their research. By doing so, this study demonstrates how these assumptions influence the result of their research. Based on data collected through sociological field observation, this study argues that the current practise in HRI research is highly anthropocentric. In short, the robots are designed to be like human instead of for human. Therefore, the human–robot relationship embodies the existing power relations between human beings. These relations generate inequality, hierarchy, and dominance, which are the opposite of the common imagination of the robotised future among roboticists. For the purpose of enabling the robotised future closer to their ideal, this study suggests that HRI researchers to go beyond the conventional methodology, to allow a human–robot relationship that realises reciprocity.

      @article{chang_how_2022,
      title = {How do {Roboticists} {Imagine} a {Robotised} {Future}? {A} {Case} {Study} on a {Japanese} {HRI} {Research} {Project}},
      shorttitle = {How do {Roboticists} {Imagine} a {Robotised} {Future}?},
      url = {https://www.preprints.org/manuscript/202204.0081/v1},
      doi = {10.20944/preprints202204.0081.v1},
      abstract = {This study observes, interprets, and analyses the knowledge production in the research field of Human\–Robot Interaction (HRI). It intends to foreground the hidden assumptions that are often taken for granted when roboticist design and conduct their research. By doing so, this study demonstrates how these assumptions influence the result of their research. Based on data collected through sociological field observation, this study argues that the current practise in HRI research is highly anthropocentric. In short, the robots are designed to be like human instead of for human. Therefore, the human\–robot relationship embodies the existing power relations between human beings. These relations generate inequality, hierarchy, and dominance, which are the opposite of the common imagination of the robotised future among roboticists. For the purpose of enabling the robotised future closer to their ideal, this study suggests that HRI researchers to go beyond the conventional methodology, to allow a human\–robot relationship that realises reciprocity.},
      language = {en},
      urldate = {2022-04-12},
      author = {Chang, Yu-Hsin and Carros, Felix and Manavi, Mehrbod and Rathmann, Martin},
      month = apr,
      year = {2022},
      note = {Publisher: Preprints},
      }


    • Carros, F., Schwaninger, I., Preussner, A., Randall, D., Wieching, R., Fitzpatrick, G. & Wulf, V. (2022)Care Workers Making Use of Robots: Results of a Three-Month Study on Human-Robot Interaction within a Care Home

      CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–15 doi:10.1145/3491102.3517435
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Research on social robots in care has often focused on either the care recipients or the technology itself, neglecting the care workers who, in and through their collaborative and coordinative practices, will need to work with the robots. To better understand these interactions with a social robot (Pepper), we undertook a 3 month long-term study within a care home to gain empirical insights into the way the robot was used. We observed how care workers learned to use the device, applied it to their daily work life, and encountered obstacles. Our findings show that the care workers used the robot regularly (1:07 hours/day) mostly in one-to-one interactions with residents. While the robot had a limited effect on reducing the workload of care workers, it had other positive effects, demonstrating the potential to enhance the quality of care.

      @inproceedings{carros_care_2022,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{CHI} '22},
      title = {Care {Workers} {Making} {Use} of {Robots}: {Results} of a {Three}-{Month} {Study} on {Human}-{Robot} {Interaction} within a {Care} {Home}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-9157-3},
      shorttitle = {Care {Workers} {Making} {Use} of {Robots}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3491102.3517435},
      doi = {10.1145/3491102.3517435},
      abstract = {Research on social robots in care has often focused on either the care recipients or the technology itself, neglecting the care workers who, in and through their collaborative and coordinative practices, will need to work with the robots. To better understand these interactions with a social robot (Pepper), we undertook a 3 month long-term study within a care home to gain empirical insights into the way the robot was used. We observed how care workers learned to use the device, applied it to their daily work life, and encountered obstacles. Our findings show that the care workers used the robot regularly (1:07 hours/day) mostly in one-to-one interactions with residents. While the robot had a limited effect on reducing the workload of care workers, it had other positive effects, demonstrating the potential to enhance the quality of care.},
      urldate = {2022-04-28},
      booktitle = {{CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Carros, Felix and Schwaninger, Isabel and Preussner, Adrian and Randall, Dave and Wieching, Rainer and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine and Wulf, Volker},
      month = apr,
      year = {2022},
      keywords = {CSCW, HCI, Participatory Design, Appropriation, Empirical Study, Care Robot, Care Work, Covid-19, Empowerment, HRI, Humanoid, Long-term, Nurse, Pandemic, Practice-based, Residential Care, Robotic Support, Social Robot, Social Service, Sustainable Technology Integration, Usage Patterns, Work Practices},
      pages = {1--15},
      }


    • Carros, F., Eilers, H., Langendorf, J., Gözler, M., Wieching, R. & Lüssem, J. (2022)Roboter als intelligente Assistenten in Betreuung und Pflege – Grenzen und Perspektiven im Praxiseinsatz

      IN Pfannstiel, M. A. (Ed.), Künstliche Intelligenz im Gesundheitswesen: Entwicklungen, Beispiele und Perspektiven Wiesbaden doi:10.1007/978-3-658-33597-7_38
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Soziale Roboter, die primär konzipiert sind, um mit menschlichen Akteuren zu interagieren, müssen sich an die Bedarfe und Anforderungen dieser menschlichen Akteure anpassen können. Für den Einsatz in der Pflege bedeutet dies, dass diese Assistenzroboter durch Pflegekräfte individuell an Bedarfe von Pflegebedürftigen adaptiert werden können und diese Roboter in der Lage sein müssen, aus der Interaktion mit Pflegebedürftigen, wie auch mit Pflegekräften zu lernen. Unter Verwendung eines partizipativen Designansatzes entwickeln und detaillieren wir Einsatzszenarien und diskutieren deren Möglichkeiten und Grenzen mit den wesentlichen Stakeholdern. Aus den so charakterisierten Einsatzszenarien leiten wir die Anforderungen an KI-Elemente ab und können so jeweils einen Minimalkatalog erforderlicher Fähigkeiten des robotischen Systems bestimmen. Auf diese Weise können einerseits die Hürden bzgl. eines Einsatzes robotischer Systeme gesenkt und andererseits die zugedachte Rolle des Roboters als Assistenzsystem für Pflegekräfte entschiedener manifestiert werden.

      @incollection{carros_roboter_2022,
      address = {Wiesbaden},
      title = {Roboter als intelligente {Assistenten} in {Betreuung} und {Pflege} – {Grenzen} und {Perspektiven} im {Praxiseinsatz}},
      isbn = {978-3-658-33597-7},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-33597-7_38},
      abstract = {Soziale Roboter, die primär konzipiert sind, um mit menschlichen Akteuren zu interagieren, müssen sich an die Bedarfe und Anforderungen dieser menschlichen Akteure anpassen können. Für den Einsatz in der Pflege bedeutet dies, dass diese Assistenzroboter durch Pflegekräfte individuell an Bedarfe von Pflegebedürftigen adaptiert werden können und diese Roboter in der Lage sein müssen, aus der Interaktion mit Pflegebedürftigen, wie auch mit Pflegekräften zu lernen. Unter Verwendung eines partizipativen Designansatzes entwickeln und detaillieren wir Einsatzszenarien und diskutieren deren Möglichkeiten und Grenzen mit den wesentlichen Stakeholdern. Aus den so charakterisierten Einsatzszenarien leiten wir die Anforderungen an KI-Elemente ab und können so jeweils einen Minimalkatalog erforderlicher Fähigkeiten des robotischen Systems bestimmen. Auf diese Weise können einerseits die Hürden bzgl. eines Einsatzes robotischer Systeme gesenkt und andererseits die zugedachte Rolle des Roboters als Assistenzsystem für Pflegekräfte entschiedener manifestiert werden.},
      language = {de},
      urldate = {2022-03-21},
      booktitle = {Künstliche {Intelligenz} im {Gesundheitswesen}: {Entwicklungen}, {Beispiele} und {Perspektiven}},
      publisher = {Springer Fachmedien},
      author = {Carros, Felix and Eilers, Hannes and Langendorf, Johanna and Gözler, Murat and Wieching, Rainer and Lüssem, Jens},
      editor = {Pfannstiel, Mario A.},
      year = {2022},
      doi = {10.1007/978-3-658-33597-7_38},
      pages = {793--819},
      }

    2020


    • Störzinger, T., Carros, F., Wierling, A., Misselhorn, C. & Wieching, R. (2020)Categorizing Social Robots with Respect to Dimensions Relevant to Ethical, Social and Legal Implications

      IN i-com, Vol. 19, Pages: 47–57 doi:10.1515/icom-2020-0005
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      The aim of this paper is to suggest a framework for categorizing social robots with respect to four dimensions relevant to an ethical, legal and social evaluation. We argue that by categorizing them thusly, we can circumvent problematic evaluations of social robots that are often based on overly broad and abstract considerations. Instead of questioning, for example, whether social robots are ethically good or bad in general, we instead propose that different configurations of (and combinations thereof) the suggested dimensions entail different paradigmatic challenges with respect to ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI). We therefore encourage practitioners to consider these paradigmatic challenges when designing social robots to find creative design solutions.

      @article{storzinger_categorizing_2020,
      title = {Categorizing {Social} {Robots} with {Respect} to {Dimensions} {Relevant} to {Ethical}, {Social} and {Legal} {Implications}},
      volume = {19},
      issn = {2196-6826},
      url = {https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/icom-2020-0005/html},
      doi = {10.1515/icom-2020-0005},
      abstract = {The aim of this paper is to suggest a framework for categorizing social robots with respect to four dimensions relevant to an ethical, legal and social evaluation. We argue that by categorizing them thusly, we can circumvent problematic evaluations of social robots that are often based on overly broad and abstract considerations. Instead of questioning, for example, whether social robots are ethically good or bad in general, we instead propose that different configurations of (and combinations thereof) the suggested dimensions entail different paradigmatic challenges with respect to ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI). We therefore encourage practitioners to consider these paradigmatic challenges when designing social robots to find creative design solutions.},
      language = {en},
      number = {1},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      journal = {i-com},
      author = {Störzinger, Tobias and Carros, Felix and Wierling, Anne and Misselhorn, Catrin and Wieching, Rainer},
      month = apr,
      year = {2020},
      note = {Publisher: De Gruyter Oldenbourg
      Section: i-com},
      pages = {47--57},
      }


    • Carros, F., Meurer, J., Löffler, D., Unbehaun, D., Matthies, S., Koch, I., Wieching, R., Randall, D., Hassenzahl, M. & Wulf, V. (2020)Exploring Human-Robot Interaction with the Elderly: Results from a Ten-Week Case Study in a Care Home

      Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–12 doi:10.1145/3313831.3376402
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Ageing societies and the associated pressure on the care systems are major drivers for new developments in socially assistive robotics. To understand better the real-world potential of robot-based assistance, we undertook a 10-week case study in a care home involving groups of residents, caregivers and managers as stakeholders. We identified both, enablers and barriers to the potential implementation of robot systems. The study employed the robot platform Pepper, which was deployed with a view to understanding better multi-domain interventions with a robot supporting physical activation, cognitive training and social facilitation. We employed the robot in a group setting in a care facility over the course of 10 weeks and 20 sessions, observing how stakeholders, including residents and caregivers, appropriated, adapted to, and perceived the robot. We also conducted interviews with 11 residents and caregivers. Our results indicate that the residents were positively engaged in the training sessions that were moderated by the robot. The study revealed that such humanoid robots can work in a care home but that there is a moderating person needed, that is in control of the robot.

      @inproceedings{carros_exploring_2020,
      address = {New York, NY, USA},
      series = {{CHI} '20},
      title = {Exploring {Human}-{Robot} {Interaction} with the {Elderly}: {Results} from a {Ten}-{Week} {Case} {Study} in a {Care} {Home}},
      isbn = {978-1-4503-6708-0},
      shorttitle = {Exploring {Human}-{Robot} {Interaction} with the {Elderly}},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376402},
      doi = {10.1145/3313831.3376402},
      abstract = {Ageing societies and the associated pressure on the care systems are major drivers for new developments in socially assistive robotics. To understand better the real-world potential of robot-based assistance, we undertook a 10-week case study in a care home involving groups of residents, caregivers and managers as stakeholders. We identified both, enablers and barriers to the potential implementation of robot systems. The study employed the robot platform Pepper, which was deployed with a view to understanding better multi-domain interventions with a robot supporting physical activation, cognitive training and social facilitation. We employed the robot in a group setting in a care facility over the course of 10 weeks and 20 sessions, observing how stakeholders, including residents and caregivers, appropriated, adapted to, and perceived the robot. We also conducted interviews with 11 residents and caregivers. Our results indicate that the residents were positively engaged in the training sessions that were moderated by the robot. The study revealed that such humanoid robots can work in a care home but that there is a moderating person needed, that is in control of the robot.},
      urldate = {2021-04-15},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2020 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
      publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
      author = {Carros, Felix and Meurer, Johanna and Löffler, Diana and Unbehaun, David and Matthies, Sarah and Koch, Inga and Wieching, Rainer and Randall, Dave and Hassenzahl, Marc and Wulf, Volker},
      month = apr,
      year = {2020},
      keywords = {ethics, user studies, elderly care, social robots, a-paper},
      pages = {1--12},
      }


    • Habscheid, S., Hrncal, C., Carros, F. & Lüssem, J. (2020)Professionelle Emotionalität und humanoide Robotik in der institutionellen Kommunikation

      IN Gruber, H., Spitzmüller, J. & de Cillia, R. (Eds.), Institutionelle und organisationale Kommunikation Theorie, Methodologie, Empirie und Kritik (Kommunikation im Fokus – Arbeiten zur Angewandten Linguistik) Wien
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @incollection{habscheid_professionelle_2020,
      address = {Wien},
      edition = {Band 9},
      title = {Professionelle {Emotionalität} und humanoide {Robotik} in der institutionellen {Kommunikation}},
      isbn = {978-3-8471-1125-2},
      url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/9783847011255.1.169.pdf},
      booktitle = {Institutionelle und organisationale {Kommunikation} {Theorie}, {Methodologie}, {Empirie} und {Kritik} ({Kommunikation} im {Fokus} – {Arbeiten} zur {Angewandten} {Linguistik})},
      publisher = {Vienna University Press bei V\&R unipress},
      author = {Habscheid, Stephan and Hrncal, Christine and Carros, Felix and Lüssem, Jens},
      editor = {Gruber, Helmut and Spitzmüller, Jürgen and de Cillia, Rudolf},
      year = {2020},
      pages = {169--188},
      }

    2019


    • Lehmann, J., Carros, F., Unbehaun, D., Wieching, R. & Lüssem, J. (2019)Einsatzfelder der sozialen Robotik in der Pflege

      Digitale Transformation im Krankenhaus., Pages: pp. 88–113
      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @inproceedings{lehmann_einsatzfelder_2019,
      title = {Einsatzfelder der sozialen {Robotik} in der {Pflege}},
      url = {https://www.lehmanns.de/shop/medizin-pharmazie/48102343-9783947566754-digitale-transformation-im-krankenhaus},
      booktitle = {Digitale {Transformation} im {Krankenhaus}},
      author = {Lehmann, Jasmin and Carros, Felix and Unbehaun, David and Wieching, Rainer and Lüssem, Jens},
      editor = {Stoffers, Christian and Krämer, Nicolas and Heitmann, Christian},
      year = {2019},
      pages = {pp. 88--113},
      }


    • Unbehaun, D., Aal, K., Carros, F., Wieching, R. & Wulf, V. (2019)Creative and Cognitive Activities in Social Assistive Robots and Older Adults: Results from an Exploratory Field Study with Pepper

      Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work-Demos and Posters., Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)
      [BibTeX]

      @inproceedings{unbehaun_creative_2019,
      title = {Creative and {Cognitive} {Activities} in {Social} {Assistive} {Robots} and {Older} {Adults}: {Results} from an {Exploratory} {Field} {Study} with {Pepper}},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 17th {European} {Conference} on {Computer}-{Supported} {Cooperative} {Work}-{Demos} and {Posters}},
      publisher = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
      author = {Unbehaun, David and Aal, Konstantin and Carros, Felix and Wieching, Rainer and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2019},
      }


    • Carros, F. (2019)Roboter in der Pflege, ein Schreckgespenst?

      doi:10.18420/muc2019-ws-588
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      Humanoide Roboter dringen verstärkt in die Wahrnehmung von Akteuren in der Pflege. Die Darstellung der verfügbaren Systeme wird durch die Medien häufig überzeichnet und führt bei den Betroffenen neben positiven Reaktion auch teilweise zu Ängsten. Dieser Beitrag geht spezifisch auf den Aspekt der Ängste ein. Entmündigung und Datenschutz sind dabei bei allen Akteuren das vorherrschende Thema und führen zu großer Verunsicherung wie das Leben und die Arbeitswelten durch den Einsatz von Robotern verändert werden. Dieser Beitrag zeigt die Ängste der unterschiedlichen Akteure auf und plädiert für eine transparente Entwicklung von Robotern die gemeinsam mit den relevanten Akteuren in der Pflege stattfinden soll.

      @article{carros_roboter_2019,
      title = {Roboter in der {Pflege}, ein {Schreckgespenst}?},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/25218},
      doi = {10.18420/muc2019-ws-588},
      abstract = {Humanoide Roboter dringen verstärkt in die Wahrnehmung von Akteuren in der Pflege. Die Darstellung der verfügbaren Systeme wird durch die Medien häufig überzeichnet und führt bei den Betroffenen neben positiven Reaktion auch teilweise zu Ängsten. Dieser Beitrag geht spezifisch auf den Aspekt der Ängste ein. Entmündigung und Datenschutz sind dabei bei allen Akteuren das vorherrschende Thema und führen zu großer Verunsicherung wie das Leben und die Arbeitswelten durch den Einsatz von Robotern verändert werden. Dieser Beitrag zeigt die Ängste der unterschiedlichen Akteure auf und plädiert für eine transparente Entwicklung von Robotern die gemeinsam mit den relevanten Akteuren in der Pflege stattfinden soll.},
      language = {de},
      urldate = {2021-04-16},
      author = {Carros, Felix},
      year = {2019},
      note = {Accepted: 2019-09-05T01:07:28Z
      Publisher: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
      }


    • Fink, V., Carros, F., Bischof, A., Wierling, A., Störzinger, T., Herms, R. & Eibl, M. (2019)Dein eigener (Maschinen) – Superheld. MERS – MRI Volume 2: Methodische, ethische, rechtliche und soziale Implikationen für die Mensch- Roboter-Interaktion in Alltagswelten

      , Publisher: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. doi:10.18420/muc2019-ws-262
      [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

      In diesem Workshop werden die aktuellen Fragestellungen und Herausforderungen aus unterschiedlichen ELSI- Bereichen der Mensch-Roboter-Interaktion aufgeführt, diskutiert und analysiert. Diese Austauschplattform gründen die Projekte, die vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung unter dem Gesichtspunkt „Technik zum Menschen bringen“ unterstützt werden. Gegenstand der Förderung sind Forschung und Entwicklung-Vorhaben um Interaktionsstrategien der Roboter für Assistenzfunktionen zu entwickeln, die flexible und leistungsfähige Lösungen für eine optimale Interaktion von Mensch und Robotern anbieten. Als Austauschgegenstände dienen zum einen die Ergebnisse aus bereits durchgeführten Living Lab Workshops und zum anderen konzeptionelle Fragestellungen, die im Laufe der Projekte sich ergeben haben.

      @inproceedings{fink_dein_2019,
      title = {Dein eigener ({Maschinen}) - {Superheld}. {MERS} – {MRI} {Volume} 2: {Methodische}, ethische, rechtliche und soziale {Implikationen} für die {Mensch}- {Roboter}-{Interaktion} in {Alltagswelten}},
      shorttitle = {Dein eigener ({Maschinen}) - {Superheld}. {MERS} – {MRI} {Volume} 2},
      url = {http://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/25158},
      doi = {10.18420/muc2019-ws-262},
      abstract = {In diesem Workshop werden die aktuellen Fragestellungen und Herausforderungen aus unterschiedlichen ELSI- Bereichen der Mensch-Roboter-Interaktion aufgeführt, diskutiert und analysiert. Diese Austauschplattform gründen die Projekte, die vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung unter dem Gesichtspunkt „Technik zum Menschen bringen“ unterstützt werden. Gegenstand der Förderung sind Forschung und Entwicklung-Vorhaben um Interaktionsstrategien der Roboter für Assistenzfunktionen zu entwickeln, die flexible und leistungsfähige Lösungen für eine optimale Interaktion von Mensch und Robotern anbieten. Als Austauschgegenstände dienen zum einen die Ergebnisse aus bereits durchgeführten Living Lab Workshops und zum anderen konzeptionelle Fragestellungen, die im Laufe der Projekte sich ergeben haben.},
      language = {de},
      urldate = {2021-11-08},
      publisher = {Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
      author = {Fink, Vera and Carros, Felix and Bischof, Andreas and Wierling, Anne and Störzinger, Tobias and Herms, Robert and Eibl, Maximilian},
      year = {2019},
      note = {Accepted: 2019-09-05T00:59:25Z},
      }

    2018


    • Habscheid, S., Hrncal, C., Lüssem, J., Wieching, R., Carros, F. & Wulf, V. (2018)Robotics and Emotion – Stereotypes vs. everyday situations

      [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

      @book{habscheid_robotics_2018,
      title = {Robotics and {Emotion} - {Stereotypes} vs. everyday situations},
      url = {https://www.europenowjournal.org/2018/07/01/robotics-and-emotion/},
      urldate = {2020-05-04},
      author = {Habscheid, Stephan and Hrncal, Christine and Lüssem, Jens and Wieching, Rainer and Carros, Felix and Wulf, Volker},
      year = {2018},
      }


    • Unbehaun, D. & Carros, F. Exergames and Dementia: Discussing and Reflecting Preliminary Results from an Exploratory Field Study

      , Pages: 4
      [BibTeX]

      @article{unbehaun_exergames_nodate,
      title = {Exergames and {Dementia}: {Discussing} and {Reflecting} {Preliminary} {Results} from an {Exploratory} {Field} {Study}},
      language = {en},
      author = {Unbehaun, David and Carros, Felix},
      pages = {4},
      }